Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to modify the Message property in Exception with additional info. For example the generated SQL from EF.

But I don't want to lose anything from the original Exception. This will make me lose the stacktrace:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw ex;
}

These Exception's are coming from the Data Layer. And I want to throw them so that they can be logged with Elmah.

What are my options?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to add something you can just wrap it in another exception:

catch( Exception ex)
{
   throw new Exception("my new message",ex);
}

and you will be able to access the inside exception with the full stack trace

share|improve this answer
    
Although this works, it's terrible advice. Not only would you loss the context of what exception was thrown but it encourages the user to catch a general Exception, which is almost always a bad idea –  James Feb 27 at 23:56
    
why would you lose the context if you wrap it as an inner exception? and since the question was - how to keep context and create a new message, it answers the question. I totally agree that you should catch specific exceptions (not always) and that you should create custom exception to throw (not always), but even strongly I believe you should answer the question you were asked too... –  Clueless Feb 28 at 0:03
    
you would lose the context in the sense that the actual exception is now an inner exception and your new exception is a general exception - so if you wanted to handle this particular exception you would need to catch Exception and then check the inner exception (which is messy). The proper solution is to derive your own exception and throw that instead. Like I said , your answer will work but it's definitely not the best way of handling this particular scenario. –  James Feb 28 at 0:33

Define your custom exception class, and put the original exception as the inner exception, and throw the wrapped exception:

public class CustomException : Exception
{
    public CustomException()
        : base()
    {
    }

    public CustomException(string message)
        : base(message) 
    { 
    }

    public CustomException(string message, Exception innerException)
        : base(message, innerException)
    { 
    }

//...other constructors with parametrized messages for localization if needed
}

catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw new CustomException("Something went wrong", ex);
}

Of course its name should be changed accordingly. This way you have full control on exceptions used in your domain, and you don't loose any information from the original throw.

It is very helpful, especially in large projects, to have custom exceptions with good class names. They help in diagnosing problems from first sight in many simple situations, without the need of reading into exception's details and debugging. The latter is needed only when some really elaborate problems occurs. Thus, throwing around bare Exception instances wrapped around each other seems a bad practice.

share|improve this answer

The short answer to your question is, you can't. An exception is effectively a fault report and as such represents a historical event. Historical events by nature are immutable therefore you can't (nor should want to) "modify" them.

Instead what you can do is add some context to the exception by catching it and throwing a new exception. This will allow you to attach additional diagnostic information and also pass in the original exception thus maintaining the entire fault trail.

I won't go into detail on how to write a custom/use exception as I have already written a detailed answer on this subject before. However, as an example, your handling code should end up looking something like

catch (SomeEntityFrameworkException ex)
{
    throw new MyCustomException("Some additional info", ex);
}
share|improve this answer

I would just make my own exception that contains the original exception and any additional information you want, create the new exception in your catch block and throw it

share|improve this answer

Just do:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw;
}

This passes the exception further without re-throwing it, and preserves context.

share|improve this answer
    
How will that add additional info to the ex.Message property? –  Quoter Feb 27 at 23:34
    
Original code sample left it out, so did I. If it is a custom exception, I presume properties that OP wants to modify are read/write. If exception is read-only, then it can't be done. The only thing I answered is how to re-throw exception without loosing stack and other context of what was captured in original. –  LB2 Feb 27 at 23:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.