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I am trying to check a template type and appropriate invoke a function. However, this doesn't seem to work. I tried with is_same, C++ compile-time type checking, compile-time function for checking type equality and the boost::is_same. Everything is giving me the same error. The following is a sample code.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
using namespace std;

class Numeric
{
public :
    bool isNumeric()
    {
    return true;
    }
};
class String
{

};

template <class T>
class Myclass
{
    private:
    T temp;
    public:
    void checkNumeric()
    {
        if(std::is_same<T,Numeric>::value)
        {
            cout << "is numeric = " << temp.isNumeric();
        }
        else
        {
            cout << "is numeric = false" << endl;
        }
    }

};

int main()
{
    Myclass<Numeric> a;
    a.checkNumeric();
    Myclass<String> b;
    b.checkNumeric();
}

While compiling the above code, I am getting the following error.

make all 
Building file: ../src/TestCPP.cpp
Invoking: GCC C++ Compiler
g++ -O0 -g3 -Wall -c -fmessage-length=0 -MMD -MP -MF"src/TestCPP.d" -MT"src/TestCPP.d" -o "src/TestCPP.o" "../src/TestCPP.cpp"
../src/TestCPP.cpp:36:36: error: no member named 'isNumeric' in 'String'
                    cout << "is numeric = " << temp.isNumeric();
                                               ~~~~ ^
../src/TestCPP.cpp:51:4: note: in instantiation of member function               'Myclass<String>::checkNumeric' requested here
    b.checkNumeric();
      ^
1 error generated.
make: *** [src/TestCPP.o] Error 1

In this case, I neither have String or Numeric class. It comes out of a third party library. I implement only MyClass which will be packaged as another library. I expect the application that uses MyClass will either pass me a String or Numeric which belongs to a third party class. MyClass is a specialized matrix operation and Dense/Sparse matrix are the Numeric and String like classes that comes from a third party library. I want to check if the application that uses my library and the third party library is invoking MyClass based on the class type that belongs to the third party library.

Kindly let me know how to fix this problem.

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5 Answers 5

No need to do anything fancy; this can be handled using ordinary template specialization.

template <class T>
class Myclass
{
    private:
    T temp;

    public:
    // called for general T
    void checkNumeric() {
        cout << "is numeric = false" << endl;
    }
};

// specialized version for T = Numeric
template<> void Myclass<Numeric>::checkNumeric() {
    cout << "is numeric = " << temp.isNumeric() << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I neither have String or Numeric class. It comes out of a third party library. I implement only MyClass which will be packaged as another library. The application that uses MyClass will either pass me a String or Numeric which belongs to a third party class. For eg., String and Numeric classes are Dense and Sparse matrix from a third party library. I want to check if the application that uses my library and the third party library is invoking MyClass based on the class type that belongs to the third party library. –  Ramakrishnan Kannan Feb 28 at 0:09
2  
@RamakrishnanKannan: This answer made changes only to Myclass –  Ben Voigt Feb 28 at 0:10
1  
Just to be clear, this works using SFINAE. The key is that the compiler has two versions of checkNumeric, and if one of them generates an error then it will be silently removed from consideration. –  Adam Feb 28 at 0:43
    
This works well and simple too. –  Ramakrishnan Kannan Feb 28 at 1:09
    
This works well and simple too. This works with all version of C++ compiler. This does not require -std=c++11 flag. –  Ramakrishnan Kannan Feb 28 at 1:16

The if else will force the compiler to instantiate both control flows. Since there are cases where T is not a Numeric type (even though code may not run through that path), this wll cause a compile error. What you need is a compile time control flow, something in the lines of if_then_else

template<int condition, int true_val, int false_val>
struct if_then_else {
    enum { val = true_val };
};

template<int true_val, int false_val>
struct if_then_else<false, true_val, false_val> {
    enum { val = false_val };
};

Then if_then_else< std::is_same<T, Numeric>::value, 1, 0>::value would give 1(true) for Numeric types and 0(false) with non numeric ones without the need to invalidly instantiate the non numeric.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you do compile time control flows for template arguments? –  Adam Feb 27 at 23:56
    
@Adam: Using function overloading. You can use enable_if to give two different types and call two different functions, or you can specialize on a boolean non-type template parameter. Or you can just specialize on the type to begin with. –  Ben Voigt Feb 28 at 0:09
    
@Adam Supposing you have c++11 there are std::conditional , std::enable_if etc. I provided a handmade example. Generally control flows are simulated with compile time recursion (see eg loop unrolling) but in such simple cases there is not need for that. –  Nikos Athanasiou Feb 28 at 0:10
    
@BenVoigt am I right to understand that both std::conditional and std::enable_if require partial specialization? Hence in this case either specialize the entire checkNumeric or make another specialized function for part of it? –  Adam Feb 28 at 0:41

You need to select enable/disable functions during compilation, not during run-time. I suggest doing something like that (code on ideone.com):

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

class Numeric {
 public:
  bool isNumeric() {
   return true;
  }
};

class String {
};

template<class T>
class Myclass {
 private:
  T temp;
 public:
  template<typename U = T, typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<U, Numeric>::value, std::size_t>::type = 0>
  void checkNumeric() {
   std::cout << "is numeric = " << temp.isNumeric() << std::endl;
  }

  template<typename U = T, typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<U, Numeric>::value, std::size_t>::type = 0>
  void checkNumeric() {
   std::cout << "is numeric = false" << std::endl;
  }
};

int main() {
 Myclass<Numeric> a;
 a.checkNumeric();
 Myclass<String> b;
 b.checkNumeric();
}

Program output:

is numeric = 1
is numeric = false

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

MyClass<T>::checkNumeric() calls T::isNumeric(). Your String class does not have such a function, so MyClass<String>::checkNumeric() does not compile.

options:

  • Add and implement String::isNumeric().
  • you're already getting your answer from std::is_same, so why call isNumeric() at all?
share|improve this answer
    
I neither have String or Numeric class. It comes out of a third party library. I implement only MyClass which will be packaged as another library. The application that uses MyClass will either pass me a String or Numeric which belongs to a third party class. For eg., String and Numeric classes are Dense and Sparse matrix from a third party library. I want to check if the application that uses my library and the third party library is invoking MyClass based on the class type that belongs to the third party library. –  Ramakrishnan Kannan Feb 28 at 0:02
    
@RamakrishnanKannan it sounds like my 2nd bullet point should handle your case. I fail to see why just is_same is inadequate. –  Adam Feb 28 at 0:42

There are two ways to solve this problem.

  1. Add addNumeric() to String. This is the easiest solution if you have permission to modify String.
  2. If you don't have permission to modify String, you can use a helper class to help with the process.

Here's the helper class.

template <typename T1> struct IsNumeric
{
   static bool get(T1 const& temp)
   {
      return false;
   }
};

template <> struct IsNumeric<Numeric>
{
   static bool get(Numeric const& temp)
   {
      return temp.isNumeric();
   }
};

Here's your main class:

template <class T>
class Myclass
{
    private:
    T temp;

    public:

    void checkNumeric()
    {
       std::cout << " is numeric = " << IsNumeric<T>::get(temp) << std::endl;
    }
};
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