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Is there a way to control the type conversion in C#? So for example, if I have two types with essentially the same details, but one is used for the internal working of my application and the other is a DTO used for communicating with non-.Net applications:

public sealed class Player
{
  public Player(string name, long score)
  {
    Name = name;
    Score = score;
    ID = Guid.NewGuid();
  }

  public string Name { get; private set; }

  public Guid ID { get; private set; }

  public long Score { get; private set; }
}

public sealed class PlayerDTO
{
  public PlayerDTO(string name, long score, string id)
  {
    Name = name;
    Score = score;
    ID = id;
  }

  public string Name { get; private set; }

  // the client is not .Net and doesn't have Guid
  public string ID { get; private set; }  

  public long Score { get; private set; }
}

Right now, I need to create a new instance of PlayerDTO from my Player instance every time and I'm looking for a better, cleaner way of doing this. One idea I had was to add an AsPlayerDTO() method to the player class, but would be nice if I can control the type conversion process so I can do this instead:

var playerDto = player as PlayerDTO; 

Anyone know if this is possible and how I might be able to do it?

Thanks,

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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can implement either implicit or explicit type conversion: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173105.aspx.

Alternately, if you want to avoid making each class having to know about the other, you can use either custom mapping or an existing mapping library like AutoMapper.

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Overloading the implicit/explicit operator seems to work for me and it's reasonably clean too. Curious though, this doesn't apply to arrays, but AutoMapper seems to give that option based on Michael Meadows' comment below. Is there a way to implement this without using 3rd extensions like AutoMapper? –  theburningmonk Feb 5 '10 at 16:21
    
Never mind, found the answer to my second question on another stackoverflow question stackoverflow.com/questions/1865031/… Array.ConvertAll(playerList.ToArray(), p => (PlayerDTO)p); –  theburningmonk Feb 5 '10 at 16:29
1  
Also, if you're using Linq, you can use Select... playerArray.Select(player => (PlayerDTO) player).ToArray(); –  Michael Meadows Feb 5 '10 at 17:01
    
thanks Michael, +1 for that, skipped me entirely :-P –  theburningmonk Feb 5 '10 at 17:28
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You can implement an explicit convesion operator between the two types.

You could also consider using AutoMapper for the task.

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+1 for AutoMapper –  mhenrixon Feb 5 '10 at 16:02
    
Also +1 for AutoMapper. The "Getting Started" is almost exactly the OP's scenario. automapper.codeplex.com/… We use an extension method that allows you to do this: var playerDto = player.MapTo<PlayerDTO>(); –  Michael Meadows Feb 5 '10 at 16:04
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What about conversion operator:

public static explicit operator PlayerDTO (Player value)...
public static implicit operator PlayerDTO (Player value)...
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You'll still have to do the code to create the DTO object, but you can overload the cast operator to cast from your implementation object to the DTO object. You can even make an implicit cast.

see overloading cast and implicit

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You can use explicit type conversions.

public sealed class Player {
  public static explicit operator PlayerDTO(Player p) {
    PlayerDTO dto;
    // construct
    return dto;
  }
}

public sealed class PlayerDTO {
  public static explicit operator Player(PlayerDTO dto) {
    Player p;
    // construct
    return p;
  }
}
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Use AutoMapper @ http://www.codeplex.com/AutoMapper

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