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I use different Windows drive partitions for the OS (C:) and software development projects (D:), so I can easily backup projects and data, separately from OS restores.

I have an external FAT32 SATA disk that is setup for booting to DOS level, so I can use Ghost to backup OS images, and restore them later.

The Ghost images were created in "split" mode, so there are multiple images, that have long file names, like this:

  • DellWork-01.001
  • DellWork-01.002
  • DellWork-01.003
  • DellWork-01.GHO

When I use the external drive with a USB adapter, DOS/Ghost creates and reads the long file names just fine.

However, when I use the same external FAT32 SATA drive with a "Modular Bay" caddy plugged into the CD slot, DOS/Ghost sees short file names, like this...

  • DELLWO~1.001
  • DELLWO~1.002
  • DELLWO~2.003 (the short names sometimes have a different number)
  • DELLWO~1.GHO

...making all the Ghost snapshots not usable. Unless of course, I rename them all using the DOS 8.3 file naming convention. Example:

  • DELLWO01.001
  • DELLWO01.002
  • DELLWO01.003
  • DELLWO01.GHO

So the question is:

  • Why does DOS see 8.3 file names when using the FAT32 SATA drive in the Modular Bay, yet DOS sees long file names when using the same FAT32 SATA drive with a USB adapter?

Other info... At DOS Level:

  • Ghost sees the internal target NTFS drive with long file names.

  • If I put the external source FAT32 drive in the internal HD slot, DOS also sees short file names.

Thanks all!

-Joe

Computer Specs:

  • Dell Latitude E6500

  • BIOS: A24

  • CPU : Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHz
  • OS : XP Pro 2002, SP3
  • RAM : 3.48 GB

  • Ghost Version: 11

  • Target restore drive format: NTFS

  • External SATA drive format : FAT32

Extra information:

Thanks, I was thinking the same thing after I posted this. Not sure if DOS actually gets invoked, and I don't know what gives it long file name support.

Grub loads a boot menu, which seems to call Ghost directly (? not sure), or through a version of DOS I'm not aware of.

Anyway, I have since found that on a different E6500, Ghost sees a "1.1" drive (without a drive letter), which shows long file names. And, Ghost sees C:, which shows short file names (both references are to the same drive partition). This 1.1 drive is not visible on the original computer, just C: with short names.

So I compared the BIOS on the two computers, and found that if I set the SATA operation on the original computer to "AHCI" mode, Ghost then sees both 1.1 (long) and C: (short).

I also found a program on the boot disc called "DOSLFN.com", which loads a TSR and turns on LFN support.

share|improve this question
    
You haven't mentioned the version of DOS you are using and how it has long filename support. –  foxidrive Feb 28 '14 at 4:56
    
On re-reading - it would seem that the USB driver has long filename support but direct reading from a SATA/IDE port does not. –  foxidrive Mar 1 '14 at 5:58

1 Answer 1

Thanks, I was thinking the same thing after I posted this. Not sure if DOS actually gets invoked, and I don't know what gives it long file name support.

Grub loads a boot menu, which seems to call Ghost directly (? not sure), or through a version of DOS I'm not aware of.

Anyway, I have since found that on a different E6500, Ghost sees a "1.1" drive (without a drive letter), which shows long file names. And, Ghost sees C:, which shows short file names (both references are to the same drive partition). This 1.1 drive is not visible on the original computer, just C: with short names.

So I compared the BIOS on the two computers, and found that if I set the SATA operation on the original computer to "AHCI" mode, Ghost then sees both 1.1 (long) and C: (short).

I also found a program on the boot disc called "DOSLFN.com", which loads a TSR and turns on LFN support.

share|improve this answer
    
You would normally add a comment - but this was long so I edited and added it to your question - which is a good way to add extra info. Please delete this 'answer' as it is not an answer. –  foxidrive Mar 1 '14 at 5:56

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