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I want to iterate over the alphabet like so:

foreach(char c in alphabet)
{
 //do something with letter
}

Is an array of chars the best way to do this? (feels hacky)

Edit: The metric is "least typing to implement whilst still being readable and robust"

share|improve this question
    
Anytime you ask a "best" question, you need to give metrics to evaluate against or else everyone is going to throw specific answers out which likely do not apply to your unique situation. –  Nick Larsen Feb 5 '10 at 16:42
    
The only thing that may be hacky as you put it is that you are using a foreach loop instead of a standard for loop, but even then its not really hacky. –  Woot4Moo Feb 5 '10 at 16:44
    
I was looking for a "neater" way than enumerating over an array of chars. The metric is "least typing to implement whilst still being readable and robust" - Richard's answer is closest to my original thinking (which I couldn't articulate at the time of questioning) –  Ben Feb 5 '10 at 16:48
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 73 down vote accepted

(Assumes ASCII, etc)

for (char c = 'A'; c <= 'Z'; c++)
{
    //do something with letter 
} 

Alternatively, you could split it out to a provider and use an iterator (if you're planning on supporting internationalisation):

public class EnglishAlphabetProvider : IAlphabetProvider
{
    public IEnumerable<char> GetAlphabet()
    {
        for (char c = 'A'; c <= 'Z'; c++)
        {
            yield return c;
        } 
    }
}

IAlphabetProvider provider = new EnglishAlphabetProvider();

foreach (char c in provider.GetAlphabet())
{
    //do something with letter 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Woah...never thought of that. Brilliant! –  Bobby Feb 5 '10 at 16:42
9  
If you neeeeed foreach: Enumerable.Range('a', 'z'-'a' + 1).Select(x=>(char)x) –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Feb 5 '10 at 16:43
    
@Richard: You just give half of the solution. I like your generic IAlphabetProvider approach, but you need a factory to get the correct provider. Something like: var provider = AlphabetProvider.GetProvider(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture); –  Steven Feb 5 '10 at 17:47
3  
It's just sample code, I can't write the entire application in my answer. FYI by having a static method, your solution is coupled to the AlphabetProvider class. –  Richard Szalay Feb 6 '10 at 10:29
1  
@Rob - argh! I forgot that normal casts don't work between generic parameters. If you write your own version of Cast, you find the compiler won't accept it unless you cast to object first. Which makes it a boxing conversion, so you can only get out exactly whatever you put in. So I withdraw my comment. –  Daniel Earwicker Feb 10 '10 at 9:33

Or you could do,

string alphabet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

foreach(char c in alphabet)
{
 //do something with letter
}
share|improve this answer
    
With this solution, internationalization is easy: use different letters :) (assuming C#'s foreach char goes by letter rather than 8-bit sequence). If it doesn't, I don't know the best approach for multi-byte characters in C#. –  Joey Adams Feb 9 '10 at 23:03
    
@JoeyAdams For internationalization, would you take the hard-coded literal out of the code and get it through the ResourceManager or something? –  Jeff Bridgman Oct 9 '13 at 21:23

Well to use the foreach loop in C#, alphabet can be any IEnumerable<char>. What feels "hacky" about it?

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Enumerable.Range(65, 26).Select(a => new { A = (char)(a) }).ToList().ForEach(c => Console.WriteLine(c.A));
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1  
Not much point newing-up an anonymous object to store a single property. And the built-in foreach statement is usually clearer for performing an action on each item of a sequence - that's what it's for. –  Daniel Earwicker Feb 9 '10 at 23:04
    
To simplify: Enumerable.Range(65, 26).ToList().ForEach(c => Console.WriteLine((char)c)); –  Eraph Jun 25 at 12:47

You could do this:

for(int i = 65; i <= 95; i++)
{
    //use System.Convert.ToChar() f.e. here
    doSomethingWithTheChar(Convert.ToChar(i));
}

Though, not the best way either. Maybe we could help better if we would know the reason for this.

share|improve this answer
1  
Agreed, need reason. –  Nick Larsen Feb 5 '10 at 16:41
5  
Needs more char! –  meagar Feb 5 '10 at 16:42

I found this:

foreach(char letter in Enumerable.Range(65, 26).ToList().ConvertAll(delegate(int value) { return (char)value; }))
{
//breakpoint here to confirm
}

while randomly reading this blog, and thought it was an interesting way to accomplish the task.

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2  
I hope this was a joke. Really :) –  mw_21 Aug 7 '12 at 14:14

protected by tchrist Sep 11 '12 at 10:58

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