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Here is a structure of hash of arrays:

[
    {
      "key1" => [
            "value1",
            {"key2" => ["value2"]},
            {"key3" =>  [
                              "value3",
                              {
                                "key4" => "value4"
                              }
                        ]
            }                 
       ]
    },
    {
        "anotherKey1" => [],
    }
]

I want desired output for that structure like filepaths:

/key1/value1
/key1/key2/value2
/key3/value3
/key3/key4/value4

How can I do that without inventing a wheel? Simple recursion could help, but is there any ready-to-go modules?

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marked as duplicate by sawa, Arup Rakshit, Marek Lipka, EdChum, Mark Rotteveel Mar 3 at 20:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
See the answers here to flatten the hash. Then join each flattened element with the directory separator. –  sawa Feb 28 at 8:36
    
Your structure is not consistent. At the leaves, you have an embedded hash like {"key2" => "value2"}, but at branches, you have an array like ["value1", ...]. That is not good. You should consistently use hashes. –  sawa Feb 28 at 8:41
1  
@sawa yeah, thanks, I edited my question –  gaussblurinc Feb 28 at 8:49

2 Answers 2

I do not think you would be reinventing any wheels to do this. You would like to traverse a nested structure of arrays and hashes and react completely different to the elements depending on whether something is an Array or a Hash. No library function is going to do exactly that for you, as you would need to vary more than one thing with blocks in order to be as flexible as you might like to be.

In short: write your recursive function to do this.

(Btw: The top level of your data structure is an array of hashes, not a hash of arrays …)

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I decided to write my own wheel (thanks for Patru, vote up).

And I have this function:

def flat_hash_of_arrays(hash,string = "",delimiter="/",result = [])

    # choose delimiter
    hash.each do |key,value|

        # string dup for avoid string-reference (oh, Ruby)
        newString = string + delimiter + key 
        # if value is array     
        if value.is_a?(Array)

            # if array not empty
            value.each do |elementOfArray|

                # if a string, I dont need recursion, hah
                if elementOfArray.is_a?(String) 
                    resultString = newString + delimiter + elementOfArray                   
                    # add new object
                    result << resultString
                end

                # if a hash, I need recursion
                if elementOfArray.is_a?(Hash)
                    flat_hash_of_arrays(elementOfArray,newString,delimiter,result)
                end                     

            end                     

        end     
    end
end

and test it:

flatten_hash = {
      "key1" => [
            "value1",
            {"key2" => ["value2"]},
            {"key3" =>  [
                              "value3",
                              {
                                "key4" => "value4"
                              }
                        ]
            },      
            "value4",
            {
                "key4" => ["value5"],
            }           
       ]
    }

result = []
flat_hash_of_arrays(flatten_hash,"","/",result)

puts result

output is:

/key1/value1
/key1/key2/value2
/key1/key3/value3
/key1/value4
/key1/key4/value5

fine!

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