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I am using Digest::MD5 module and in that hexdigest returning different value for windows and linux.

please help me in solving the issue.

use Digest::MD5;
my $ctx=Digest::MD5->new();
open RD, "input.txt";
$ctx->addfile(*RD);
close RD;
print $ctx->hexdigest;

input.txt file has below content:

hello

output: windows

5d41402abc4b2a76b9719d911017c592

output: Linux

af5597c29467a96523a70787c319f4db

Thanks,
Saravanan

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1  
How do you know those two input.txt are the same? –  Lee Duhem Feb 28 at 10:38
2  
@leeduhem he could md5 them to verify! –  RobEarl Feb 28 at 10:51
1  
@RobEarl Yes, he can. But he does not believe the results of md5. –  Lee Duhem Feb 28 at 11:00

2 Answers 2

According to the comments given by the asker, the input.txt is generated in Windows and then is copied to Linux, then I believe the problem is caused by the difference between Windows and Linux end-of-line, in Windows end-of-line is '\r\n', in Linux '\n'.Therefore, using binmode() set the filehandler to binary mode should be able to fix this, as suggested in the examples of Digest::MD5.

This should fix the problem:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

use Digest::MD5;

open my $fh, '<', 'input.txt' or die "Cannot open input.txt: $!";
binmode $fh, ':raw'; # <==== NOTE this binmode()

my $md5 = Digest::MD5->new;
$md5->addfile($fh);
print $md5->hexdigest, "\n";
close $fh;
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Thanks I tried its working after adding binmode in windows I have added binmode in windows and in linux i removed binmode now I am getting same value. –  Saravanan Feb 28 at 11:17
2  
@Saravanan It is no need to remove the binmode() in your Windows version script. –  Lee Duhem Feb 28 at 11:27
2  
You may prefer binmode $file, ':raw' to make the access mode explicit. In any case, $file is a poor name for anything. It could be a file name string, a file path string, or, unusually as here, a file handle. I suggest at least $fn, $path, $fh. –  Borodin Feb 28 at 13:28
    
@Borodin You are right, $file is a bad choose for a reference of file handler. Answer updated. –  Lee Duhem Feb 28 at 15:04

That can be because each time the hash value changes, you can refer this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5

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