Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the Great book of Bruce Eckel, Thinking in java, there is a very good sample test for method overloading that I've presented here with a little modifications. The writer is very delicate and mentions a strange point : char promotes to int instead of byte or short; but doesn't say the reason! Does anybody knows the reason?
[Please look at the strange output of the testChar()]


public class TypeCast {
    void f1(char x) { print("f1(char) "); } 
    void f1(byte x) { print("f1(byte) "); } 
    void f1(short x) { print("f1(short) "); } 
    void f1(int x) { print("f1(int) "); } 
    void f1(long x) { print("f1(long) "); } 
    void f1(float x) { print("f1(float) "); } 
    void f1(double x) { print("f1(double) "); } 
    void f2(byte x) { print("f2(byte) "); } 
    void f2(short x) { print("f2(short) "); } 
    void f2(int x) { print("f2(int) "); } 
    void f2(long x) { print("f2(long) "); } 
    void f2(float x) { print("f2(float) "); } 
    void f2(double x) { print("f2(double) "); } 
    void f3(short x) { print("f3(short) "); } 
    void f3(int x) { print("f3(int) "); } 
    void f3(long x) { print("f3(long) "); } 
    void f3(float x) { print("f3(float) "); } 
    void f3(double x) { print("f3(double) "); } 
    void f4(int x) { print("f4(int) "); } 
    void f4(long x) { print("f4(long) "); } 
    void f4(float x) { print("f4(float) "); } 
    void f4(double x) { print("f4(double) "); } 
    void f5(long x) { print("f5(long) "); } 
    void f5(float x) { print("f5(float) "); } 
    void f5(double x) { print("f5(double) "); } 
    void f6(float x) { print("f6(float) "); } 
    void f6(double x) { print("f6(double) "); } 
    void f7(double x) { print("f7(double) "); } 
    void testConstVal() { 
        print("5: "); 
        f1(5);f2(5);f3(5);f4(5);f5(5);f6(5);f7(5); print(""); 
    } 

    void testChar() { 
        char x = 'x';
        print("char: "); 
        f1(x);f2(x);f3(x);f4(x);f5(x);f6(x);f7(x); print(""); 
    } 
    void testByte() { 
        byte x = 0; 
        print("byte: "); 
        f1(x);f2(x);f3(x);f4(x);f5(x);f6(x);f7(x); print(""); 
    } 
    void testShort() { 
        short x = 0; 
        print("short: "); 
        f1(x);f2(x);f3(x);f4(x);f5(x);f6(x);f7(x); print(""); 
    } 
    void testInt() { 
        int x = 0; 
        print("int: "); 
        f1(x);f2(x);f3(x);f4(x);f5(x);f6(x);f7(x); print(""); 
    } 
    void testLong() { 
        long x = 0; 
        print("long: "); 
        f1(x);f2(x);f3(x);f4(x);f5(x);f6(x);f7(x); print(""); 
    } 
    void testFloat() { 
        float x = 0; 
        print("float: "); 
        f1(x);f2(x);f3(x);f4(x);f5(x);f6(x);f7(x); print(""); 
    } 
    void testDouble() { 
        double x = 0; 
        print("double: "); 
        f1(x);f2(x);f3(x);f4(x);f5(x);f6(x);f7(x); print(""); 
    }

    void print(Object o) {
        System.out.println(o);
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        TypeCast p =  new TypeCast(); 
        p.testConstVal(); 
        p.testChar(); 
        p.testByte(); 
        p.testShort(); 
        p.testInt(); 
        p.testLong(); 
        p.testFloat(); 
        p.testDouble(); 
    } 

}
share|improve this question
    
Are you asking why Java designers designed it the way they did? –  joragupra Feb 28 '14 at 10:36
    
Probably related: stackoverflow.com/q/17063436/2024761 –  R.J Feb 28 '14 at 10:39
1  
@Paul Hicks A char is composed of 2 bytes in Java –  Patrick Feb 28 '14 at 10:39
    
@PaulHicks: Seems every type promotes to the closest type that is bigger than it, and char behaves differently. –  mok Feb 28 '14 at 10:44
2  
Alright everyone, nothing to see here. Time to clean up the comments. –  Paul Hicks Feb 28 '14 at 10:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

char is promoted to an int because that is the closest type that can hold all of char's values without loss of precision.

char is a 16-bit unsigned type, so neither byte nor short could hold all of its values (byte is only 8 bits; short is 16 bits, but it is signed).

share|improve this answer
    
It's Rational.Thank you. I tested these two short s = 65535;// caused error. but char c = 65535;//worked well –  mok Feb 28 '14 at 10:58
3  
Just for the records: there are exceptions to the rule; int is promoted to float and long to double though it includes a possible loss of precision. Only the magnitude is safely preserved then. –  Holger Feb 28 '14 at 12:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.