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Xunit have a nice feature, that you can create one test with 'theory' parameter, and put data in 'InlineData' parameter and xUnit will generete many tests, and test it all -> Link to example

I want to have something like this, but parameter to my method is not 'simple data' (like string, int, double), but list of my class:

public static void WriteReportsToMemoryStream(IEnumerable<MyCustomClass> listReport, MemoryStream ms, StreamWriter writer)
{
}
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2 Answers 2

There are many xxxxData attributes in XUnit. Check out for example PropertyData attribute.

You can implement a property that returne IEnumerable<object[]>. Each of object[] that this method generates will be then "unpacked" as a parameters for a single call to your [Theory] method.

Another option is ClassData, which works the same, but allows to easily share the 'generators' between tests in different classes/namespaces, and also separates the 'data generators' from the actual test methods.

See i.e. these examples from here:

PropertyData Example

public class StringTests2
{
    [Theory, PropertyData("SplitCountData")]
    public void SplitCount(string input, int expectedCount)
    {
        var actualCount = input.Split(' ').Count();
        Assert.Equal(expectedCount, actualCount);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<object[]> SplitCountData
    {
        get
        {
            // Or this could read from a file. :)
            return new[]
            {
                new object[] { "xUnit", 1 },
                new object[] { "is fun", 2 },
                new object[] { "to test with", 3 }
            };
        }
    }
}

ClassData Example

public class StringTests3
{
    [Theory, ClassData(typeof(IndexOfData))]
    public void IndexOf(string input, char letter, int expected)
    {
        var actual = input.IndexOf(letter);
        Assert.Equal(expected, actual);
    }
}

public class IndexOfData : IEnumerable<object[]>
{
    private readonly List<object[]> _data = new List<object[]>
    {
        new object[] { "hello world", 'w', 6 },
        new object[] { "goodnight moon", 'w', -1 }
    };

    public IEnumerator<object[]> GetEnumerator()
    { return _data.GetEnumerator(); }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    { return GetEnumerator(); }
}
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Could you please paste the examples here? Just in case the link ever becomes broken. –  dcastro Feb 28 at 11:34
    
@dcastro: yeah, I'm actually searching for some on original xunit docs –  quetzalcoatl Feb 28 at 11:36
    
Hm.. didn't find any. I'll use these then. –  quetzalcoatl Feb 28 at 11:42
    
When or why would you use ever ClassData? It looks like just a heavier version of PropertyData. Instead of making that whole IndexOfData class, I would much rather just turn that _data field into a static property and use it in a PropertyData. –  Nick Aug 28 at 16:12
1  
@Nick: I agree that's similar to PropertyData, but also, you have pointed out the reason for it: static. That's exactly why I wouldn't. ClassData is when you want to escape from statics. By doing so, you can reuse (i.e. nest) the generators easier. –  quetzalcoatl Aug 29 at 8:02

I guess you mistaken here. What actually xUnit Theory attribute means: You what to test this function by sending special/random values as parameters that this function-under-test receive. That's mean that what you define as the next attribute such as: InlineData, PropertyData, ClassData, etc.. will be the source for those parameters. That's mean that you should construct the source object to provide those parameters. In your case I guess you should use ClassData object as source. Also - please note that ClassData inherit from: IEnumerable<> - that's mean each time another set of generated parameters will be used as incoming parameters for function-under-test untill IEnumerable<> produce values.

Example here: Tom DuPont .NET

Example may be incorrect - I didn't use xUnit for a long time

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