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I am using Apple's MyGizmoClass Singleton class for program-wide "session variables" and loving it! However, when I run "Build and Analyze" it gives weird results. Maybe my usage is wrong (it works, but it may be working due to a flakey side effect). Here is an example.

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section {

    int ct = 0;
    MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager];
    ct = [[myGizmoClass searchResultsForResortLocation] count];
    [myGizmoClass release];
    NSLog(@"ct: %d",ct);
    return ct;
}

or

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated {


     // Uncomment the following line to display an Edit button in the navigation bar for this view controller.
     //self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItem = self.editButtonItem;

    NSMutableString *which_resort = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
    NSMutableString *category_code = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];
    MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager];

    ...

    which_resort = [self which_resort_location_are_we_in];

    ... 
    [myGizmoClass setWhich_resort:which_resort];

    int useDebugMode = [myGizmoClass useDebugMode]; 

    ...


    [myGizmoClass release];

    [which_resort release];
    [category_code release];

    [super viewWillAppear:animated];

}

Again, this usage may be WAY off, but I thought each method I used a value from the singleton I had to do:

MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager];

and

[myGizmoClass release];

BUT i am getting these errors during Analyze:

/Users/jgobble/Documents/ProgramName/Classes/ResortsListViewController.m:495:2 Incorrect decrement of the reference count of an object is not owned at this point by the caller /Users/jgobble/Documents/ProgramName/Classes/ResortsListViewController.m:493:30 Method returns an Objective-C object with a +0 retain count (non-owning reference) /Users/jgobble/Documents/ProgramName/Classes/ResortsListViewController.m:495:2 Incorrect decrement of the reference count of an object is not owned at this point by the caller

Now, please take this into account: I am calling this:

MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager];

at the beginning of EVERY method need a "session variable" and then calling:

[myGizmoClass release];

at the end of that method PRIOR to returning a result (if i return a result from that function.

Is this not the way I should do it?

This is the ONLY thing that the analyzer (thank goodness) is reporting wrong with the program. I do not know if i should ignore it. I do not know if I am doing the calls in the right place.

Here is another question I am worried about: Does this work or do the subsequent calls to *myGizmoClass mess anything up?

-(void) function_a {
     MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager];

     [myGizmoClass setC:1];

     int result_b = [self function_b];

     printf("Addition result is: %d", result_b);

     [myGizmoClass release]
}

-(int) function_b {
     MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager];

     int b = 0;

     b = b + [myGizmoClass c];

     [myGizmoClass release]

     return b;
}

(i have not tested the code above)

In other words there anything wrong with calling MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager]; from function_b when you have not released MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager]; from function_a?

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+1 A good question that was very well presented. –  TechZen Feb 5 '10 at 22:17
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is the way that you are using a singleton. The general idea is that you don't retain or release any singleton objects, because there is only one instance that hangs around, and the Apple implementation of singletons are coded in such a way that you can't. This brings about some issues that Peter Hosey blogged about with a better implementation of a Cocoa singleton.

The warnings that the Analyzer logs are simply stating that you "shouldn't" retain or release the singleton object; by virtue of the fact that you call [MyGizmoClass sharedManager] you shouldn't be releasing anyway (following the Cocoa memory management guidelines).

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so, with the example of variable: 'c' type int (in MyGizmoClass.h) i have it defined as: @property int c; but if it were an NSString: @property (nonatomic,retain) NSString *c; is the way I would do it. Are you saying the NSString should be like: @property (nonatomic) NSString *c; and I should never call [myGizmoClass release]? Okay .. I can understand that...but when and where should I call: MyGizmoClass *myGizmoClass= [MyGizmoClass sharedManager]; if i want it available to the entire class that I am in? Do i still call it at the start of each function/method? –  Jann Feb 5 '10 at 19:36
1  
Peters notion that singletons should not override retain/release is, to my mind, totally wrong. Objects should be robust in the face of programmer abuse - if you must, have it throw an exception in release in debug mode to correct bad coding behavior. But you want to avoid the possibility where you can of having a rogue retain take down the whole app, which not protecting singleton leaves wide open. Defense AND stability in depth is key for good application development. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Feb 5 '10 at 20:37
    
@Jann: The idea behind singletons is that only one instance is ever created – this is done in the -sharedManager method where a static instance of the MyGizmoClass is created (only once) and returned. As an optimization the instance is likely to be created on the first call to -sharedManager. As of this, you can access the shared manager whenever you need to and don't need to store it in an ivar or anything, so yes. –  Alex Rozanski Feb 5 '10 at 20:47
1  
@Kendall I think it's pretty subjective and there's a lot of conflicting viewpoints around singletons. I can see where you're coming from, but from the point of writing bad code, if you overrelease or overretain then your application will crash or leak memory, and you should know about it – preventing retain/release removes any semantic value and can potentially introduce silent bugs from this. –  Alex Rozanski Feb 5 '10 at 20:56
    
Followup: The code Peter presents as "correct" is pretty dangerous, read down to my comment for the explanation. Basically if you call alloc/init and then release not remembering it's a singleton, when you call alloc/init again as you would expect to work instead you'll get a crash. Always override release. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Feb 5 '10 at 21:09
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You should not be releasing myGizmoClass. When [MyGizmoClass sharedManager] is called, the returned object is not being retained. Since it's a shared object, its only owner is its class other object is responsible for releasing it unless they first retain it.

Take a look at this short guide from Apple on using singleton objects in your Objective-C code.

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@Marc Sorry, forgot to tell you that Apple's MyGizmoClass Singleton silently overrides retain/release. That would make a difference as to whether or not my "release" did anything...tho still having it used in referring to a correctly-implemented singleton is incorrect according to the above statements. Thx –  Jann Feb 6 '10 at 0:09
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