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When I try to read a String from memcached that I set in python:

import memcache

MC_SERVER = "192.168.1.100"
MC_PORT = "11211"

mc = memcache.Client(['%s:%s' % (MC_SERVER, MC_PORT)], debug=0)
mc.set("test_string", "true")
print mc.get("test_string")

Java tells me is doesn't exist and obviously returns null when I try to get it:

import com.danga.MemCached.*;
public class Tester {

        // create a static client as most installs only need
        // a single instance
        protected static MemCachedClient mcc = new MemCachedClient(true, false);

        // set up connection pool once at class load
        static {

                // server list and weights
                String[] servers =
                        {
                          "192.168.1.100:11211"
                        };

                // grab an instance of our connection pool
                SockIOPool pool = SockIOPool.getInstance();

                // set the servers and the weights
                pool.setServers( servers );

                // set some TCP settings
                // disable nagle
                // set the read timeout to 3 secs
                // and don't set a connect timeout
                pool.setNagle( false );
                pool.setSocketTO( 3000 );
                pool.setSocketConnectTO( 0 );

                // initialize the connection pool
                pool.initialize();
        }

        // from here on down, you can call any of the client calls
        public static void main(String[] args) {
                //System.out.println( mcc.set( "test_string", "blah!" ) ); // everything is great is value is set by Java
                System.out.println( mcc.keyExists( "test_string" ) ); // output is false when value set by python
                System.out.println( mcc.get( "test_string" ) ); // output is null when value set by python
        }
}

I am guessing it has something to do with the Object serialization / un-serialization across languages but I thought I might be OK for simple Strings - anyone run into this before?

Here are the libs I am using:

http://www.tummy.com/Community/software/python-memcached/

http://github.com/gwhalin/Memcached-Java-Client/downloads

share|improve this question
    
You should do verbose logging on the memcached server, and make sure that what you think is happening is actually happening. –  Jonathan Feinberg Feb 5 '10 at 19:57
    
Good suggestion, but I don't actually have access to this particular memcached server. I tried this other java lib and it seems to work as expected: code.google.com/p/spymemcached I'd still like to know why the other lib isn't working - just curious. –  jckdnk111 Feb 5 '10 at 20:26
    
It's possible that it couldn't understand the value that was being returned. You can configure spymemcached to emulate Whalin's transcoder and see if it also fails. –  Dustin Feb 5 '10 at 23:30

3 Answers 3

The solution right from documentation:

If you need to support multiple clients (i.e. Java, PHP, Perl, etc.) you need to make a few changes when you are setting things up:

// use a compatible hashing algorithm
pool.setHashingAlg( SockIOPool.NEW_COMPAT_HASH );

// store primitives as strings
// the java client serializes primitives
//
// note: this will not help you when it comes to
// storing non primitives
mcc.setPrimitiveAsString( true );

// don’t url encode keys
// by default the java client url encodes keys
// to sanitize them so they will always work on the server
// however, other clients do not do this
mcc.setSanitizeKeys( false );
share|improve this answer
    
This worked for my problem of using the telnet interface to memcache and then trying to retrieve those values using the java memcached api (com.danga). One example of where the documentation referred to in this answer is here: geelou.com/javadocs/java_memcached-release_2.0.1/com/danga/… –  Paul Dec 30 '13 at 13:25

Doesn't Java use unicode? If so, I suspect that python is writing to memcache using the ASCII / latin 1 character set. As a result, the keys look very different ("test_string" vs. "t\00e\00s\00t\00_\00s\00t\00r\00i\00n\00g\00").

Try using this, and see what happens.

import memcache

MC_SERVER = "192.168.1.100"
MC_PORT = "11211"

mc = memcache.Client(['%s:%s' % (MC_SERVER, MC_PORT)], debug=0)
mc.set(u"test_string", u"true")
print mc.get(u"test_string")
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea, unfortunately the python lib can't handle unicode keys: memcache.MemcachedStringEncodingError: Keys must be str()'s, not unicode. Convert your unicode strings using mystring.encode(charset) I tried the mystring.encode("utf-8") method as well and although it got rid of the python exception, it didn't fix the problem. –  jckdnk111 Feb 5 '10 at 21:31
    
I think Java uses utf-16 for its native encoding, so try 'utf-16', 'utf-16le' and 'utf-16be' for the charset. The le/be options may or may not be necessary. –  Simon Callan Feb 5 '10 at 22:23

Make sure that memcached service is started , if it is already started then restart the service.

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