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I have a problem with the way R coerces variable types when using rbind of two data.frames with NA values. I illustrate by example:

x<-factor(sample(1:3,10,T))
y<-rnorm(10)
dat<-data.frame(x,y)
NAs<-data.frame(matrix(NA,ncol=ncol(dat),nrow=nrow(dat)))
colnames(NAs)<-colnames(dat)

Now the goal is to append dat and NAs while keeping the variable types factor and numeric of x and y. When I give:

dat_forward<-rbind(dat,NAs)
is.factor(dat_forward$x)

this works fine. However the backward direction using rbind fails:

dat_backward<-rbind(NAs,dat)
is.factor(dat_backward$x)
is.character(dat_backward$x)

Now x is coerced to character level. I am confused - can't it stay factor type even if I use the other order of binding? What would be a straight forward change to my code to reach my goal?

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3  
From ?rbind.data.frame: "It then takes the classes of the columns from the first data frame...". This is why you're seeing the order matter in your call to rbind. –  josilber Feb 28 '14 at 16:28
    
@josilber Thank you, is there a straight forward fix to my problem? –  tomka Feb 28 '14 at 16:29
4  
convert the first column of NAs to factor? –  Matthew Plourde Feb 28 '14 at 16:34
    
@josilber rbind(dat[0,], NAs, dat) seems to contradict that. –  Matthew Plourde Feb 28 '14 at 16:37
2  
@MatthewPlourde One sentence earlier in the documentation: "The rbind data frame method first drops all zero-column and zero-row arguments." –  josilber Feb 28 '14 at 16:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here's a fairly simple way to get the column classes right:

x <- rbind(dat[1,], NAs, dat)[-1,]
str(x)
#  $ x: Factor w/ 3 levels "1","2","3": NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...
#  $ y: num  NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

More generally, if you are really needing this often, you could create an rbind-like function that takes an additional argument indicating the data.frame to whose column classes you'd like to coerce all of the others' columns:

myrbind <- function(x, ..., template=x) {
    do.call(rbind, c(list(template[1,]), list(x), list(...)))[-1,]
}

str(myrbind(NAs, dat,  template=dat))
# 'data.frame': 20 obs. of  2 variables:
#  $ x: Factor w/ 3 levels "1","2","3": NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...
#  $ y: num  NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

## If no 'template' argument is supplied, myrbind acts just like rbind    
str(myrbind(dat, NAs))
# 'data.frame': 20 obs. of  2 variables:
#  $ x: Factor w/ 3 levels "1","2","3": 3 3 3 3 2 3 1 1 3 2 ...
#  $ y: num  0.303 1.77 -1.38 1.731 0.033 ...
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Thanks, both an easy solution and a nice function. –  tomka Feb 28 '14 at 17:12

Similarly, you could just convert the column in NAs to factor

NAs$x<-factor(NAs$x)
dat_backward<-rbind(NAs,dat) 
is.factor(dat_backward$x) # TRUE
is.character(dat_backward$x) # FALSE
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data.frame does a lot of things incorrectly when rbind'ing different types together, and especially when that involves factors. Start using data.table (1.8.11+) instead and you won't have these issues:

library(data.table)
dt1 = data.table(dat)
dt2 = data.table(NAs)

sapply(rbind(dt1, dt2), class)
#        x         y 
# "factor" "numeric" 
sapply(rbind(dt2, dt1), class)
#        x         y 
# "factor" "numeric" 
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From ?rbind.data.frame, we read: "It then takes the classes of the columns from the first data frame...". This is why you're seeing the order matter in your call to rbind.

To get the variable classes of dat_forward with the ordering of dat_backward, you could just construct dat_forward and reorder the rows:

dat_new = rbind(dat, NAs)[c((nrow(dat)+1):(nrow(dat)+nrow(NAs)), 1:nrow(dat)),]
str(dat_new)
# 'data.frame': 20 obs. of  2 variables:
#  $ x: Factor w/ 3 levels "1","2","3": NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...
#  $ y: num  NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ...
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One approach would be to create NAs with the correct column datatypes. This can be easily done with

NAs <- dat[NA,]

You can also make as many rows as desired with

num.rows <- 30
NAs <- dat[NA,][1:num.rows,]
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