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i wrote this for class, when you input the letter it should return the gas related to the character. So far i've only been able to get the screen to return "unknown" no matter what can anyone help.

#include <stdio.h>

int
main(void)
{
char color; /* input- character indicating gass */

// Color of the gas 
printf("Enter first letter of the color of cylinder > ");
scanf_s("%c",&color); /* scan first letter */

/* Display first character followed by gas */
printf("The gas in the cylinder is %c", color);
switch (color) 
{
    case 'O':
    case 'o':
        printf("Ammonia\n");
        break;

    case 'B':
    case 'b':
        printf("Carbon Monoxide\n");
        break;

    case 'Y':
    case 'y':
        printf("Hydrogen\n");
        break;
    case 'G':
    case 'g':
        printf("Oxygen\n");
        break;

    default:
        printf("unknown\n");
} 

return(0);
}
share|improve this question
    
Try color = fgetc(stdin); rather than that scanf_s. – WhozCraig Feb 28 '14 at 16:40
    
Compiling with gcc using -Wall, I get "warning: format ‘%c’ expects type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘int *’" – Fred Larson Feb 28 '14 at 16:41
    
scanf_s() returns an integer containing the number of arguments that are filled with data. What number does it report? Additionally, can you include the full output that you see when running the program, including your user input? Preferably with the fix of changing color to a char. – Bill Lynch Feb 28 '14 at 16:46
    
I commented out the switch statement and when i call upon the stored character it doesn't return anything. just my printf statement without what should've been stored with %c, color . – user3365689 Feb 28 '14 at 16:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is there some reason you want to use scanf_s()?

This works:

#include <stdio.h>

int
main(void)
{
int color; /* input- character indicating gass */

// Color of the gas
printf("Enter first letter of the color of cylinder > ");
color=getchar(); /* scan first letter */

/* Display first character followed by gas */
printf("The gas in the cylinder is %c\n", color);
switch (color)
{
    case 'O':
    case 'o':
        printf("Ammonia\n");
        break;

    case 'B':
    case 'b':
        printf("Carbon Monoxide\n");
        break;

    case 'Y':
    case 'y':
        printf("Hydrogen\n");
        break;
    case 'G':
    case 'g':
        printf("Oxygen\n");
        break;

    default:
        printf("unknown\n");
}

return(0);
}

c02kt3esfft0:~ mbobak$ ./test
Enter first letter of the color of cylinder > o
The gas in the cylinder is o
Ammonia
c02kt3esfft0:~ mbobak$ ./test
Enter first letter of the color of cylinder > b
The gas in the cylinder is b
Carbon Monoxide
c02kt3esfft0:~ mbobak$ ./test
Enter first letter of the color of cylinder > y
The gas in the cylinder is y
Hydrogen
c02kt3esfft0:~ mbobak$ ./test
Enter first letter of the color of cylinder > g
The gas in the cylinder is g
Oxygen
c02kt3esfft0:~ mbobak$ ./test
Enter first letter of the color of cylinder > q
The gas in the cylinder is q
unknown
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was going off an example in the book in which they used scanf_s. – user3365689 Feb 28 '14 at 17:09

It may be that 'int' is 4 bytes, while the switch is looking at only one byte. Thus the switch may only see the high order 0x00 byte of color. The first thing I'd try is changing color from int to char.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried using char before. – user3365689 Feb 28 '14 at 16:46
    
The scanf() should be writing the character byte into the high end of the 4 byte (probably) integer, and possibly leaving garbage in the other 3 bytes. It didn't work if the only change is changing int color; to char color;? Also, you may be misusing scanf_s. Read the "remarks" in msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w40768et.aspx – Phil Perry Feb 28 '14 at 16:55
    
color=getchar(); Suggested by Mark below worked. – user3365689 Feb 28 '14 at 17:15

That is because you are reading a character into an uninitialized integer which will result in undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
Changed from into to char before didn't work. – user3365689 Feb 28 '14 at 16:44

Not a C coder, but it looks to me like you are casting the character to an integer? Which is why it can't switch - it's comparing a char with an int.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried char before didn't work. Thanks for the comment though. – user3365689 Feb 28 '14 at 16:44

your call to scanf_s should be as follows:

char color;
scanf_s("%c",&color,1);

This worked for me.

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