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I have a method, foo, that yields objects. I want to count the number of objects it yields.

I have

def total_foo
  count = 0
  foo { |f| count += 1}
  count
end

but there's probably a better way. Any ideas for this new Rubyist?

Here's the definition for foo (it's a helper method in Rails):

def foo(resource=@resource)
  resource.thingies.each do |thingy|
    bar(thingy) { |b| yield b }  # bar also yields objects
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
How foo is defined? – toro2k Feb 28 '14 at 17:08
    
what is wrong with what you have now? – akonsu Feb 28 '14 at 17:09
    
@akonsu it works, but I was wondering if there's a better Ruby way to do it. E.g. foo.count – Dennis Feb 28 '14 at 17:15
    
@Dennis well, I mean that this is a clear and an easy to understand code. Although, why yield all these objects if you just need their count? But maybe this is outside of the scope of the question. – akonsu Feb 28 '14 at 17:17
    
@akonsu foo is also being called elsewhere, though I could rewrite it not to yield. But say you can't change the method's behaviour, is this the best option you have to count the yields? – Dennis Feb 28 '14 at 17:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Any method that calls yield can be used to build an Enumerator object, on which you can call count, by means of the Object#to_enum method. Remember that when you call count the iterator is actually executed so it should be free of side effects! Following a runnable example that mimics your scenario:

@resources = [[1,2], [3,4]]

def foo(resources = @resources)
  resources.each do |thingy|
    thingy.each { |b| yield b }
  end
end

foo { |i| puts i }
# Output:
# 1
# 2
# 3
# 4

to_enum(:foo).count
# => 4

You can pass an argument to foo:

to_enum(:foo, [[5,6]]).count
# => 2

Alternatively you can define foo to return an Enumerator when it's called without a block, this is the way stdlib's iterators work:

def foo(resources = @resources)

  return to_enum(__method__, resources) unless block_given?

  resources.each do |thingy|
    thingy.each { |b| yield b }
  end
end

foo.count
# => 4

foo([[1,2]]).count
# => 2

foo([[1,2]]) { |i| puts i }
# Output:
# 1
# 2

You can pass a block to to_enum that is called when you call size on the Enumerator to return a value:

def foo(resources = @resources)
  unless block_given?
    return to_enum(__method__, resources) do
      resources.map(&:size).reduce(:+) # thanks to @Ajedi32
    end
  end

  resources.each do |thingy|
    thingy.each { |b| yield b }
  end
end

foo.size
# => 4

foo([]).size
# => 0

In this case using size is sligthly faster than count, your mileage may vary.

share|improve this answer
1  
how do you pass a parameter to foo? – akonsu Feb 28 '14 at 17:29
    
@akonsu Just pass the additional arguments to the to_enum method. – Ajedi32 Feb 28 '14 at 17:30
    
the documentation says "arguments ... will be passed in method in addition to the item itself." this is confusing, what item? do you know what they are talking about? – akonsu Feb 28 '14 at 17:33
    
@akonsu Check the documentation for Ruby 2.1, it should be clearer. – toro2k Feb 28 '14 at 17:36
    
@Ajedi32 Thanks for the edit, but after seeing it I realized in this case the "size" block doesn't make really sense, it's point is to not iterate over the enumerable to compute the size. – toro2k Feb 28 '14 at 17:57

Assuming you otherwise only care about the side-effect of foo, you could have foo itself count the iterations:

def foo(resource=@resource)
  count = 0
  resource.thingies.each do |thingy|
    bar(thingy) do |b|
      count += 1
      yield b
    end  # bar also yields objects
  end
  count
end

And then:

count = foo { |f| whatever... }

You can also ignore the return value if you choose, so just:

foo { |f| whatever... }

In cases you don't care what the count is.

There may be better ways to handle all of this depending upon the bigger context.

share|improve this answer
    
That could work, but I find it messier than what I have now. Though I could rename foo to make it more clear that it yields something and returns a count. – Dennis Feb 28 '14 at 17:24
    
@Dennis I can understand that. Like I mentioned, it does depend upon the context. What I show encapsulates everything you want about foo inside of the definition of foo. But it's maybe a little more verbose than some alternatives. There may be a better way to do the whole thing, depending upon what bar and thingies are. :) – lurker Feb 28 '14 at 17:26

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