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Consider I have a loop with a conditional inside, if the condition is true then the current iteration of the loop has to be repeated. For example, consider the following method. Read the note inside the if statement.

def func1(arr)
  size = arr.size - 1
  max = arr[size]
  0.upto(size) do |x|
    if (*boolean statement*)
      *repeat current iteration*
    end
  end
  func2(arr)
end

How would I go about doing this? In case you are wondering why I need this is because I'm modifying the array such that if the conditional is true for a given x, then the element at index x is removed and placed at the end of the array. If the loop continues then it skips the element after x because this one now has the index of the one removed. In java this is done with the continue keyword I think, is there a ruby equivalent?

Thanks!

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1  
What is max = arr[size] for? Don't write it if it is not doing anything. –  sawa Feb 28 '14 at 19:54

2 Answers 2

Use redo:

def func1(arr)
  size = arr.size - 1
  max = arr[size]
  0.upto(size) do |x|
    redo if (*boolean statement*)
  end
  func2(arr)
end
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Wow, Ruby sometimes looks like a big hack. How does this even work for general Enumerators? I cannot imagine this to have well-defined behaviour in every case... –  Niklas B. Feb 28 '14 at 20:01
    
@NiklasB. Internally, down at the assembly level, I'm sure it is just a goto (more specifically a jump of one form or another). –  Matt Feb 28 '14 at 20:06
    
It can't be, because it works with stateful generators as well (like one reading lines from a file). I think it just caches the arguments passed to the block and then calls the block again with the same arguments if you call redo inside the block. I initially thought this would be some kind of call_cc/setjmp magic which would be pretty scare, but gladly it isn't :) –  Niklas B. Feb 28 '14 at 20:10
    
@NiklasB. It doesn't look like it caches the arguments. Here's an example: 1.upto(5) { |i| p i; i = 4; redo if i == 4 }. The output is 1 4 4 4 ... with newlines in between the numbers. i is modified within the block, and it seems to retain this value on the redo. So it does look like a simple goto. –  Matt Feb 28 '14 at 20:18
    
i is not modified in your example. Integers are immutable. Just check the following: e = Enumerator.new { |y| y << [1] ;y << [1] }; cnt = 1; e.each { |x| puts "%s:%s" % [x.object_id, x.to_s]; x << 2; redo if (cnt-=1) >= 0 } –  Niklas B. Feb 28 '14 at 20:21

If I understand your question it seems you simply need to replace your 'if' conditional with a 'while' one:

def func1(arr)
  size = arr.size - 1
  max = arr[size]
  0.upto(size) do |x|
    while (*boolean statement*)
      *repeat current iteration*
    end
  end
  func2(arr)
end
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