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Using scala 2.10.3, my goal is to make the following work:

object A {
  implicit class Imp(i: Int) {
    def myPrint() {
      println(i)
    }
  }
}

object B {
  implicit class Imp(i: String) {
    def myPrint() {
      println(i)
    }
  }
}

import A._
import B._

object MyApp extends App {
  3.myPrint()
}

This fails with

value myPrint is not a member of Int

If I give A.Imp and B.Imp different names (for example A.Imp1 and B.Imp2), it works.

Diving a bit deeper into it, there seems to be the same problem with implicit conversions.

This works:

object A {
  implicit def Imp(i: Int) = new {
    def myPrint() {
      println(i)
    }
  }

  implicit def Imp(i: String) = new {
    def myPrint() {
      println(i)
    }
  }
}

import A._

object MyApp extends App {
  3.myPrint()
}

Whereas this doesn't:

object A {
  implicit def Imp(i: Int) = new {
    def myPrint() {
      println(i)
    }
  }
}

object B {
  implicit def Imp(i: String) = new {
    def myPrint() {
      println(i)
    }
  }
}

import A._
import B._

object MyApp extends App {
  3.myPrint()
}

Why? Is this a bug in the scala compiler? I need this scenario, since my objects A and B derive from the same trait (with a type parameter) which then defines the implicit conversion for its type parameter. In this trait, I can only give one name for the implicit conversion. I want to be able to import more of these objects into my scope. Is there a way to do that?

edit: I can't give the implicit classes different names, since the examples above are only breaking down the problem. My actual code looks more like

trait P[T] {
  implicit class Imp(i: T) {
    def myPrint() {
      ...
    }
  }
}

object A extends P[Int]
object B extends P[String]

import A._
import B._
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1  
It sounds like all you need is the member function to be the same name, not the implicit name itself. Why do you need to call both "Imp?" –  wheaties Feb 28 at 21:16
    
I have only one place where I define the implicit. This is in the generic parent trait. Therefore I can only give one name to it. All objects then inherit from that trait and allow using it for different types. –  Heinzi Feb 28 at 21:20
    
(see edit above) –  Heinzi Feb 28 at 21:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The implicits just have to be available as a simple name, so you can rename on import.

Just to verify:

scala> import A._ ; import B.{ Imp => BImp, _ }
import A._
import B.{Imp=>BImp, _}

scala> 3.myPrint
3
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