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Giving the string:

foo='Hello     \    
World! \  
x

we are friends

here we are'

Supose there are also tab characters mixed with spaces after or before the \ character. I want to replace the spaces, tabs and the slash by only a space. I tried with:

echo "$foo" | tr "[\s\t]\\\[\s\t]\n\[\s\t]" " " | tr -s " "

Returns:

Hello World! x we are friend here we are 

And the result I need is:

Hello World! x

we are friends

here we are

Some idea, tip or trick to do it? Could I get the result I want in only a command?

share|improve this question
1  
Note: tr deals in lists of characters, but you appear to be trying to pass it a regular expression (\s*\\\s*\n\s*). This may appear to work at first, but isn't actually doing what you expect; in this case, (partly because of quirks in backslash parsing in double quotes), it'll replace "\", "s", "*", and newline characters with spaces. –  Gordon Davisson Mar 1 at 7:23

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

The following one-liner gives the desired result:

echo "$foo" | tr '\n' '\r' | sed 's,\s*\\\s*, ,g' | tr '\r' '\n'
Hello World!

we are friends

here we are

Explanation:

tr '\n' '\r' removes newlines from the input to avoid special sed behavior for newlines.

sed 's,\s*\\\s*, ,g' converts whitespaces with an embedded \ into one space.

tr '\r' '\n' puts back the unchanged newlines.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The simplest way and works ok! :) –  Joana Mar 10 at 9:13
foo='Hello     \    
World! \  
x

we are friends

here we are'

If you use double quotes then the shell will interpret the \ as a line continuation character. Switching to single quotes preserves the literal backslash.

I've added an backslash after World! to test multiple backslash lines in a row.

sed -r ':s; s/( )? *\\ *$/\1/; Te; N; bs; :e; s/\n *//g' <<< "$foo"

Output:

Hello World! x

we are friends

here we are

What's this doing? In pseudo-code you might read this as:

while (s/( )? *\\ *$/\1/) {  # While there's a backslash to remove, remove it...
    N                        # ...and concatenate the next line.
}

s/\n *//g                    # Remove all the newlines.

In detail, here's what it does:

  1. :s is a branch labeled s for "start".
  2. s/( )? *\\ *$/\1/ replaces a backslash and its surrounding whitespace. It leaves one space if there was one by capturing ( )?.
  3. If the previous substitution failed, Te jumps to label e.
  4. N concatenates the following line, including the newline \n.
  5. bs jumps back to the start. This is so we can handle multiple consecutive lines with backslashes.
  6. :e is a branch labeled e for "end".
  7. s/\n *//g removes all the extra newlines from step #4. It also removes leading spaces from following line.

Note that T is a GNU extension. If you need this to work in another version of sed, you'll need to use t instead. That'll probably take an extra b label or two.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation, but could you tell me why this doesn't works? pastebin.com/g2iPnyvG Thanks! :) –  Joana Mar 5 at 21:46
1  
@JohnDoe Updated my answer to also remove leading spaces from the line following a backslash. I changed the last substitution from s/\n//g to s/\n *//g. –  John Kugelman Mar 5 at 22:23
    
I replaced all the ' *' by '[ \t]' to include the tabs too, but it does not works. To test the new case, just add tabs and spaces randomly in the lines after the character '\'. Thanks for all, Jhon. :) –  Joana Mar 6 at 7:59
    
Could you help me with the last question posted in the previuscomment, please? –  Joana Mar 10 at 7:24

Try as below:

#!/bin/bash

foo="Hello     \
World!"

echo $foo | sed 's/[\s*,\\]//g'
share|improve this answer
    
The whitespace coalescing due to the unquoted $foo after the echo is working some of its magic here. Note sure if this was intended as part of the solution –  1_CR Feb 28 at 23:59
    
Thank You Sabuj, It's my first answer :) –  Alex Feb 28 at 23:59
    
A bracket expression denotes a set of characters, and most regex-special chars have no special meaning in brackets. The expression [\s*,\\] will match an s (in some sed's), a star, a comma, or a backslash. You probably want sed 's/[ \\]\+/ /g' –  glenn jackman Mar 1 at 0:05
    
It prints two spaces between "Hello" and "World!". –  Joana Mar 1 at 0:18

If you just want to print the output as given, you just need to:

foo='Hello     \
World!'
bar=$(tr -d '\\' <<<"$foo")
echo $bar    # unquoted!
Hello World!

If you want to squeeze the whitespace as it's being stored in the variable, then one of:

bar=$(tr -d '\\' <<<"$foo" | tr -s '[:space:]' " ")
bar=$(perl -0777 -pe 's/\\$//mg; s/\s+/ /g' <<<"$foo")

The advantage of the perl version is that it only removes line continuation backslashes (at the end of the line).


Note that when you use double quotes, the shell takes care of line continuations (proper ones with no whitespace after the slash:

$ foo="Hello    \
World"
$ echo "$foo"
Hello    World

So at this point, it's too late.

If you use single quotes, the shell won't interpret line continuations, and

$ foo='Hello     \
World!

here we are'
$ echo "$foo"
Hello     \
World!

here we are
$ echo "$foo" | perl -0777 -pe 's/(\s*\\\s*\n\s*)/ /sg'
Hello World!

here we are
share|improve this answer
1  
Warning: using unquoted variable expansions to coalesce whitespace isn't safe, because it may also expand wildcards. –  Gordon Davisson Mar 1 at 7:24
    
Question updated, could you help me in the new case? Thanks! –  Joana Mar 5 at 11:12

You could use a read loop to get the desired output.

arr=()
i=0
while read line; do
    ((i++))
    [ $i -le 3 ] && arr+=($line)
    if [ $i -eq 3 ]; then
        echo ${arr[@]}
    elif [ $i -gt 3 ]; then
        echo $line
    fi
done <<< "$foo"
share|improve this answer

With awk:

$ echo "$foo"
Hello     \
World! \
x

we are friends

here we are

With trailing newline:

$ echo "$foo" | awk '{gsub(/[[:space:]]*\\[[:space:]]*/," ",$0)}1' RS= FS='\n' ORS='\n\n'
Hello World! x

we are friends

here we are
                                                                                              .

Without trailing newline:

$ echo "$foo" | 
awk '{
  gsub(/[[:space:]]*\\[[:space:]]*/," ",$0)
  a[++i] = $0
}
END {
  for(;j<i;) printf "%s%s", a[++j], (ORS = (j < NR) ? "\n\n" : "\n")
}' RS= FS='\n' 
Hello World! x

we are friends

here we are
share|improve this answer

sed is an excellent tool for simple subsitutions on a single line but for anything else just use awk. This uses GNU awk for multi-char RS (with other awks RS='\0' would work for text files that don't contain NUL chars):

$ echo "$foo" | awk -v RS='^$' -v ORS= '{gsub(/\s+\\\s+/," ")}1'
Hello World! x

we are friends

here we are
share|improve this answer

With bashisms such as extended globbing, parameter expansion etc...but it's probably just as ugly

foo='Hello     \    
World!'
shopt -s extglob
echo "${foo/+( )\\*( )$'\n'/ }"
Hello World!
share|improve this answer
1  
I think the shorter and (slightly) less ugly echo "${foo/+($'\n'| |\\)/ }" is equivalent. –  chepner Mar 1 at 22:58

As I understand, you want to just remove trailing spaces followed by an backslash-escaped newline?

In that case, search with the regex ( ) *\\\n and replace with \1

share|improve this answer
    
Using sed, tr... ? Could you explain the code or give me a little example, please? Thanks! –  Joana Mar 5 at 15:34
    
@JohnDoe: The regex basically finds a single space, followed by any number of spaces (zero-or-many), followed by a backslash and newline. You the replace it with a single space, consuming the other spaces, slash and newline. I don't have a bash environment handy at the moment, but I'll try to give a complete call later. –  carlpett Mar 5 at 15:43

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