Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the google protocol buffers encoding overview, they introduce something called "Zig Zag Encoding", this takes signed numbers, which have a small magnitude, and creates a series of unsigned numbers which have a small magnitude.

For example

Encoded => Plain
0 => 0
1 => -1
2 => 1
3 => -2
4 => 2
5 => -3
6 => 3

And so on. The encoding function they give for this is rather clever, it's:

(n << 1) ^ (n >> 31) //for a 32 bit integer

I understand how this works, however, I cannot for the life of me figure out how to reverse this and decode it back into signed 32 bit integers

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Try this one:

(n >> 1) ^ (-(n & 1))

Edit:

I'm posting some sample code for verification:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  unsigned int n;
  int r;

  for(n = 0; n < 10; n++) {
    r = (n >> 1) ^ (-(n & 1));
    printf("%u => %d\n", n, r);
  }

  return 0;
}

I get following results:

0 => 0
1 => -1
2 => 1
3 => -2
4 => 2
5 => -3
6 => 3
7 => -4
8 => 4
9 => -5
share|improve this answer
1  
I knew there had to be a way around the multiply. Kudos! –  ergosys Feb 5 '10 at 23:18
    
This one doesn't seem to work :/ –  Martin Feb 5 '10 at 23:20
    
Well, it works for me and for ergosys, so it should work for you too... Can you tell me what results you get? –  3lectrologos Feb 5 '10 at 23:23
1  
I think this may be a language problem, translating that pretty much directly into C# results in an error, negating a UInt32 results in a long, and xor of long and UInt32 is undefined. I'm going to have a go at fixing it for C# –  Martin Feb 5 '10 at 23:42
1  
return ((int)(u >> 1)) ^ ((int)(-(u & 1))); The power of casting has fixed it. So, the question remains which should I use, from what ergosys said above I would assume this is faster due to a lack of multiplication? –  Martin Feb 5 '10 at 23:44
show 13 more comments

How about

(n>>1) - (n&1)*n
share|improve this answer
    
well it works, but how? –  Martin Feb 5 '10 at 23:17
    
n even: n/2 n odd: n/2 - n –  ergosys Feb 5 '10 at 23:30
    
huh, that's pretty neat –  Martin Feb 5 '10 at 23:31
    
Bit twiddling ftw! –  LiraNuna Feb 5 '10 at 23:36
add comment

Here's yet another way of doing the same, just for explanation purposes (you should obviously use 3lectrologos' one-liner).

You just have to notice that you xor with a number that is either all 1's (equivalent to bitwise not) or all 0's (equivalent to doing nothing). That's what (-(n & 1)) yields, or what is explained by google's "arithmetic shift" remark.

int zigZag_to_signed(unsigned int zigzag)
{
    int abs = (int) zigzag >> 1;

    if(zigzag % 2)
        return ~abs;
    else
        return abs;
}

unsigned int signed_to_zigZag(int signed)
{
    unsigned int abs = (unsigned int) signed << 1;

    if(signed < 0)
        return ~abs;
    else
        return abs;
}

So in order to have lots of 0's on the most significant positions, zigzag encoding uses the LSB as sign bit, and the other bits as the absolute value (only for positive integers actually, and absolute value -1 for negative numbers due to 2's complement representation).

share|improve this answer
add comment

I have found a solution, unfortunately it's not the one line beauty I was hoping for:

uint signMask = u << 31;
int iSign = *((Int32*)&signMask);
iSign >>= 31;
signMask = *((UInt32*)&iSign);

UInt32 a = (u >> 1) ^ signMask;
return *((Int32*)&a);
share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm sure there's some super-efficient bitwise operations that do this faster, but the function is straightforward. Here's a python implementation:

def decode(n):
  if (n < 0):
    return (2 * abs(n)) - 1
  else:
    return 2 * n

>>> [decode(n) for n in [0,-1,1,-2,2,-3,3,-4,4]]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but unfortunately this is in a network encoding system for a game, and this particular decode function is used many times per packet, many times per second - it's gotta be fast –  Martin Feb 5 '10 at 23:20
    
You can use a simple bit op to speed this up a bit. Shift by 1 to multiply by 2. –  William Morrison Oct 17 '13 at 14:13
add comment

After fiddling with the accepted answer proposed by 3lectrologos, I couldn't get it to work when starting with unsigned longs (in C# -- compiler error). I came up with something similar instead:

( value >> 1 ) ^ ( ~( value & 1 ) + 1 )

This works great for any language that represents negative numbers in 2's compliment (e.g. .NET).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.