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I am using iText 2.1.7 and I am creating tables for a document that have very complex styling. Many of the cells within these tables are quite different from each other style-wise but there are common styling rules that they all share. For example, here is a code snippet:

PdfPTable statementInfoTable = new PdfPTable(2);

PdfPCell cell = new PdfPCell(new Phrase("Payees on Statement"));
cell.setColspan(2);
cell.setBorder(Rectangle.NO_BORDER);
cell.setPadding(Dimensions.QUARTER_INCH / 4);
cell.setVerticalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_MIDDLE);
cell.setBackgroundColor(ColorUtil.LIGHT_GREY);
statementInfoTable.addCell(cell);

for (int i = 0; i < payees.length; i++) {
    Chunk label = new Chunk(String.format("Payee %d: ", i + 1), FontManager.getBodyFont(Font.BOLD));
    Chunk name = new Chunk(payees[i], FontManager.getBodyFont(Font.NORMAL));
    Phrase payee = new Phrase();
    payee.add(label);
    payee.add(name);
    cell = new PdfPCell(payee);
    cell.setBorder(Rectangle.NO_BORDER);
    cell.setPadding(Dimensions.QUARTER_INCH / 4);
    cell.setVerticalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_MIDDLE);
    statementInfoTable.addCell(cell);

    cell = new PdfPCell(new Phrase(String.format("ID: %s", payeeIds[i])));
    cell.setHorizontalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_RIGHT);
    cell.setBorder(Rectangle.NO_BORDER);
    cell.setPadding(Dimensions.QUARTER_INCH / 4);
    cell.setVerticalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_MIDDLE);
    statementInfoTable.addCell(cell);
}

This produces a table that looks exactly as I specify it in code. You might notice, though, that all of the cells I am defining here have 3 styles in common. Namely:

cell.setBorder(Rectangle.NO_BORDER);
cell.setPadding(Dimensions.QUARTER_INCH / 4);
cell.setVerticalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_MIDDLE);

To reduce the repeated code, I made a small modification where I define a PdfPCell instance to contain common style configuration, and then all cells that I add to the table now "inherit" from it via the PdfPCell(PdfPCell) constructor. Take a look:

PdfPTable statementInfoTable = new PdfPTable(2);

PdfPCell defaultCell = new PdfPCell();
defaultCell.setBorder(Rectangle.NO_BORDER);
defaultCell.setPadding(Dimensions.QUARTER_INCH / 4);
defaultCell.setVerticalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_MIDDLE);

PdfPCell cell = new PdfPCell(defaultCell);
cell.setColspan(2);
cell.setBackgroundColor(ColorUtil.LIGHT_GREY);
cell.addElement(new Phrase("Payees on Statement"));
statementInfoTable.addCell(cell);

for (int i = 0; i < payees.length; i++) {
    Chunk label = new Chunk(String.format("Payee %d: ", i + 1), FontManager.getBodyFont(Font.BOLD));
    Chunk name = new Chunk(payees[i], FontManager.getBodyFont(Font.NORMAL));
    Phrase payee = new Phrase();
    payee.add(label);
    payee.add(name);
    cell = new PdfPCell(defaultCell);
    cell.addElement(payee);
    statementInfoTable.addCell(cell);

    cell = new PdfPCell(defaultCell);
    cell.setHorizontalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_RIGHT);
    cell.addElement(new Phrase(String.format("ID: %s", payeeIds[i])));
    statementInfoTable.addCell(cell);
}

Taking this approach greatly reduces the amount of code required for some of my more complex tables, but for whatever reason this approach also has very strange effects on the table styling when it is rendered.

Specifically:

  • I can no longer specify cell.setHorizontalAlignment(Element.ALIGN_RIGHT);. Everything always renders left-aligned much to my frustration.
  • I am seeing extra padding added to the top of every cell. I think this might be because the leading of my cells is being set to a non-zero value in the background somehow.

As far as I can tell, the three common rules are still being applied correctly to the cells that inherit the defaultCell, and all the other cell-specific styling aside from the two cases I listed above are correct as well. Can anyone shed light as to why this small code rearrangement is producing such different results?

share|improve this question
    
Whatever is wrong in iText 5.5.0, we'll fix; if the behavior of iText 2.1.7 frustrates you, please understands that it also frustrates us. See itextpdf.com/salesfaq You can do something about this frustration by upgrading to a version of our software that isn't 5 years old. –  Bruno Lowagie Mar 1 '14 at 9:35
    
Thank you for your response Mr. Lowagie, I am well aware of the differences between the versions of iText. Unfortunately, my hands are tied on the matter as my project does not meet the non-commercial requirements of the AGPL and my employer is not willing to purchase a commercial license. Is my question a confirmed bug for iText 2.1.7? –  Set Mar 1 '14 at 9:43
    
iText 2.1.7 is no longer supported. This means we don't answer any question about that version anymore. It's up to you to convince your employer that he shouldn't take the risk to introduce iText 2.1.7 into his code base. –  Bruno Lowagie Mar 1 '14 at 9:46
    
And by the way: now that I've actually read your question, I see that it's not a bug. You're not using iText correctly. –  Bruno Lowagie Mar 1 '14 at 10:00
    
I am relieved then. I will continue to search for the "correct" way to use iText and, in the meantime, perhaps someone who is not a stakeholder will take the time to consider my question. –  Set Mar 1 '14 at 10:09

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