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I'm using a third party web service. In order for my users to be able to access their third party account, they need to log in. I provide the interface for them to log in to the third party site from my site. My question is, do I need a SSL certificate if the webservice already provides one? The webservice has a special Login method, which uses the https protocol. Does this mean that I don't need one for my site, or will I have to purchase a SSL certificate for my site?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you need to explain a bit more about what you are doing.

Are you using iframes or redirects so that the third party site can do the authentication? If so, then you're probably fine and don't need your own certificate.

If, on the other hand, the user is making HTTP requests to your site that contain their credentials then you've got a problem. Technically speaking, you don't need to use SSL for this, but it's kind of bad behavior. If you're going to accept user credentials for some third party you should at least try to match the third-party's level of security.

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The user enters the information to my server, which then calls the third party method. I'm guessing this means that an SSL certificate is needed since the initial transaction is to my server. Might be an obvious question, but is there another way of directly calling a web service, without the data being sent to my server first? Or is that a service that has be provided by the third party? Thanks –  keyboardP Feb 6 '10 at 18:51
    
There are ways to have the client authenticate directly with the third-party, but they generally require that the third-party have support for this. (Unless the third-party has an XSRF vulnerability, but you don't really want to rely on that...) It sounds like what you want is OAuth (oauth.net) but that isn't much use to you unless the third-party service you're using has support for it. (A number of services, like Flickr and Google Calendar, have OAuth-like schemes that I believe predate OAuth.) –  Laurence Gonsalves Feb 7 '10 at 0:07
    
Thank you for the explanation (and answer!), Laurence. –  keyboardP Feb 7 '10 at 1:07

Because your users log in through your site and will provide their credentials to your web application, you should attempt to protect them as well as you can. So you should enable SSL on your site and get a certificate.

That said, if you don't care about security, then it would also work without an SSL/certificate.

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