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Given

class Bird
  def self.bird_ancestors
    ancestors.first(ancestors.find_index(Bird)+1)
  end
end

class Duck < Bird
end

class FeatheredDuck < Duck
end

FeatheredDuck.bird_ancestors => [FeatheredDuck,Duck,Bird]
Duck.bird_ancestors => [Duck,Bird]
Bird.bird_ancestors => [Bird]

How can I reference the Bird within Bird without having it be explicit? I know self and __class__ doesnt work.

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3  
The ordering of your class definitions is wrong. – Agis Mar 1 '14 at 15:09
2  
Also, what you mean by "self doesn't work"? Inside a class method, self refers to the current class. – Agis Mar 1 '14 at 15:11
    
Also, you seem to be presenting so much things irrelevant to your question. – sawa Mar 1 '14 at 15:26
    
@sawa, you may have misunderstood the question. Note the title. – Cary Swoveland Mar 1 '14 at 17:43
1  
You can do this by selecting elements of ancestors that respond_to? __method__. – Cary Swoveland Mar 1 '14 at 18:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This will do it:

class Bird
  def self.bird_ancestors
    ancestors.take_while { |c| c.respond_to? __method__ }
  end  
end

class Duck < Bird
end

class FeatheredDuck < Duck
end

FeatheredDuck.bird_ancestors #=> [FeatheredDuck, Duck, Bird]
Duck.bird_ancestors          #=> [Duck, Bird]
Bird.bird_ancestors          #=> [Bird]

select also works, but take_while (suggested by @Aditya) is better because it stops searching ancestors once false is returned from the block.

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Inside a class method, self refers to the current class object:

class Bird
  def self.foo
    self
  end
end

p Bird.foo # => "Bird"
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1  
This doesn't do it. The asker wishes to extract ancestors though Bird. – Cary Swoveland Mar 1 '14 at 17:44
    
@agis you are right but for Duck.foo and FeatheredDuck.foo it would resolve to Duck and FeatheredDuck and not Bird which his what I want. – Aditya Sanghi Mar 1 '14 at 19:12

you can do something like this:

class Bird
  def self.bird_ancestors
      class_name =  method(__method__).owner.to_s.gsub(/#<Class:|>/,'')
      ancestors.first(ancestors.map{|x| x.to_s}.find_index(class_name)+1)
  end
end

(__method__ is the current method)
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