Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to prepare for a future in computer science, so I started with ECMAScript and I am now trying to learn more about Python. Coming from ECMAScript, seeing multiple assignments such as a, b, c = 1, 2, 3 leaves me bewildered for a moment, until I realize that there are multiple assignments going on. To make things a bit clearer, I'd really like to do (a, b, c) = (1, 2, 3) but I am not sure if this will be a measurable performance hit. From what I understand, tuples are essentially how multiple assignments work regardless, but there are a great many oddities in the world, so I try not to assume anything.

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
4  
Here's a hint for your future in computer science (I've been in the business for 30+ years). Don't spend time on this kind of optimization question until you can prove that the multiple assignment statement is absolutely killing your program. Until you have proof that something's unacceptably slow, use it. Use everything without worrying about the performance. Folks who invented the language already worried about that for you. –  S.Lott Feb 6 '10 at 11:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It should not have any effect on performance. The parenthesis do not make it a tuple, the comma's do. So (1,2,3) is exactly the same as 1,2,3

share|improve this answer
    
Ah... I didn't even think of that. Thanks. –  Reid Feb 6 '10 at 3:01

It's extremely easy to check, with the dis module:

>>> import dis
>>> dis.dis(compile('a,b,c=1,2,3','','exec'))
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               4 ((1, 2, 3))
              3 UNPACK_SEQUENCE          3
              6 STORE_NAME               0 (a)
              9 STORE_NAME               1 (b)
             12 STORE_NAME               2 (c)
             15 LOAD_CONST               3 (None)
             18 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> dis.dis(compile('(a,b,c)=(1,2,3)','','exec'))
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               4 ((1, 2, 3))
              3 UNPACK_SEQUENCE          3
              6 STORE_NAME               0 (a)
              9 STORE_NAME               1 (b)
             12 STORE_NAME               2 (c)
             15 LOAD_CONST               3 (None)
             18 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> 

See? Those totally redundant parentheses make absolutely no difference to the bytecode that's generated and executed -- just like, say, a+b and (a+b) will generate and execute exactly the same bytecode as each other. So, if you like to add redundant parentheses, knock yourself out -- people reading your code may not like them, but ones who are just executing it will never even notice. Only, why stop at just two pairs of redundant parentheses? See,

>>> dis.dis(compile('(((a,b,c)))=(((1,2,3)))','','exec'))
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               4 ((1, 2, 3))
              3 UNPACK_SEQUENCE          3
              6 STORE_NAME               0 (a)
              9 STORE_NAME               1 (b)
             12 STORE_NAME               2 (c)
             15 LOAD_CONST               3 (None)
             18 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> 

six pairs of redundant parentheses (or any number, really) still produce exactly the same code. Once you leave the obvious minimum number of redundant parentheses (none at all: they're redundant, after all;-), exactly where do you stop?-) And why there, when it's "free" to add yet one more pair... or two... or three...?-)

share|improve this answer

It also works for lists:

a, b, c = [1, 2, 3]

works just as well

share|improve this answer
    
And its called 'unpacking' in python –  Jeffrey Jose Apr 13 '10 at 18:50

Multiple assignment is implemented as a combination of tuple packing and tuple unpacking, to my knowledge, so it should have the same effect.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.