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This is not a homework, I am just curious.

INFINITE is the key word here.

I wish to use it as for p in primes(). I believe that this is a built-in function in Haskell.

So, the answer cannot be as naive as "Just do a Sieve".

First of all, you do not know how many consecutive primes will be consumed. Well, suppose you could concoct 100 of them at a time. Would you use the same Sieve approach as well as the frequency of prime numbers formula?

I prefer non-concurrent approach.

Thank you for reading (and writing ;) )!

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Built in Function in Haskell? which module? –  st0le Oct 7 '10 at 9:36
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13 Answers 13

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I still like what I wrote up here (a Cookbook recipe with many other authors) -- it shows how a Sieve of Eratosthenes has no intrinsic limits, and the comments and discussion, I believe, make it quite clear. This was recently discussed on Stack Overflow (search for the authors' names, I guess) and somebody proposed a substantially faster (but IMHO less clear) version;-).

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“If I have seen further…”

The erat2 function from the cookbook can be further sped up (by about 20-25%):

erat2a

import itertools as it
def erat2a( ):
    D = {  }
    yield 2
    for q in it.islice(it.count(3), 0, None, 2):
        p = D.pop(q, None)
        if p is None:
            D[q*q] = q
            yield q
        else:
            # old code here:
            # x = p + q
            # while x in D or not (x&1):
            #     x += p
            # changed into:
            x = q + 2*p
            while x in D:
                x += 2*p
            D[x] = p

The not (x&1) check verifies that x is odd. However, since both q and p are odd, by adding 2*p half of the steps are avoided along with the test for oddity.

erat3

If one doesn't mind a little extra fanciness, erat2 can be sped up by 35-40% with the following changes (NB: needs Python 2.7+ or Python 3+ because of the itertools.compress function):

import itertools as it
def erat3( ):
    D = { 9: 3, 25: 5 }
    yield 2
    yield 3
    yield 5
    MASK= 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0,
    MODULOS= frozenset( (1, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29) )

    for q in it.compress(
            it.islice(it.count(7), 0, None, 2),
            it.cycle(MASK)):
        p = D.pop(q, None)
        if p is None:
            D[q*q] = q
            yield q
        else:
            x = q + 2*p
            while x in D or (x%30) not in MODULOS:
                x += 2*p
            D[x] = p

The erat3 function takes advantage of the fact that all primes (except for 2, 3, 5) modulo 30 result to only eight numbers: the ones included in the MODULOS frozenset. Thus, after yielding the initial three primes, we start from 7 and work only with the candidates.
The candidate filtering uses the itertools.compress function; the “magic” is in the MASK sequence; MASK has 15 elements (there are 15 odd numbers in every 30 numbers, as chosen by the itertools.islice function) with a 1 for every possible candidate, starting from 7. The cycle repeats as specified by the itertools.cycle function.
The introduction of the candidate filtering needs another modification: the or (x%30) not in MODULOS check. The erat2 algorithm processed all odd numbers; now that the erat3 algorithm processes only r30 candidates, we need to make sure that all D.keys() can only be such —false— candidates.

Benchmarks

Results

On an Atom 330 Ubuntu 9.10 server, versions 2.6.4 and 3.1.1+:

$ testit
up to 8192
==== python2 erat2 ====
100 loops, best of 3: 18.6 msec per loop
==== python2 erat2a ====
100 loops, best of 3: 14.5 msec per loop
==== python2 erat3 ====
Traceback (most recent call last):
…
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'compress'
==== python3 erat2 ====
100 loops, best of 3: 19.2 msec per loop
==== python3 erat2a ====
100 loops, best of 3: 14.1 msec per loop
==== python3 erat3 ====
100 loops, best of 3: 11.7 msec per loop

On an AMD Geode LX Gentoo home server, Python 2.6.5 and 3.1.2:

$ testit
up to 8192
==== python2 erat2 ====
10 loops, best of 3: 104 msec per loop
==== python2 erat2a ====
10 loops, best of 3: 81 msec per loop
==== python2 erat3 ====
Traceback (most recent call last):
…
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'compress'
==== python3 erat2 ====
10 loops, best of 3: 116 msec per loop
==== python3 erat2a ====
10 loops, best of 3: 82 msec per loop
==== python3 erat3 ====
10 loops, best of 3: 66 msec per loop

Benchmark code

A primegen.py module contains the erat2, erat2a and erat3 functions. Here follows the testing script:

#!/bin/sh
max_num=${1:-8192}
echo up to $max_num
for python_version in python2 python3
do
    for function in erat2 erat2a erat3
    do
        echo "==== $python_version $function ===="
        $python_version -O -m timeit -c \
        -s  "import itertools as it, functools as ft, operator as op, primegen; cmp= ft.partial(op.ge, $max_num)" \
            "next(it.dropwhile(cmp, primegen.$function()))"
    done
done
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1  
This is an impressive, albeit belated answer. I would encourage others to up-vote as well. –  Hamish Grubijan Sep 27 '10 at 14:28
1  
Thanks; I usually catch up from the RSS feed, and I see questions about 3-4 weeks later :) –  tzot Sep 27 '10 at 20:51
    
BTW the function erat2a here is almost exactly the version by Tim Hochberg from ActiveState recipes, dated Feb 2006, except it counts up by itself from 3, with a while True loop. –  Will Ness May 22 '12 at 7:11
2  
@WillNess: oh, now I see your point (which I missed :). Yes, both answers have the same speed-up, but it's a coincidence. And thanks to you, I saw the new interface (probably licensed the app from stackexchange). Re-visited my old account there too; first contribution was 10 years ago, last one 5 years ago. Time flies like an arrow (but fruit flies like a banana :). –  tzot May 22 '12 at 19:11
1  
What I meant is we all reinvent wheels (ahem, bicycles), all the time. But it's fun. :) I've made more substantial comments at Alex Martelli's post above yours right here, see if it'll interest you. :) There's a more substantial improvement described there, bringing the space complexity down radically, and improving time complexity as a consequence as well. –  Will Ness May 22 '12 at 21:52
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Since the OP asks for an efficient implementation, here's a significant improvement to the active state 2002 code by David Eppstein/Alex Martelli (seen here in his answer): don't record a prime's info in the dict until its square is seen among the candidates. Brings space complexity down to below O(sqrt(n)) instead of O(n), for n primes produced ( pi(sqrt(n log n)) ~ 2 sqrt(n log n) / log(n log n) ~ sqrt(n / log n) ). Consequently, time complexity is also improved, i.e. it runs faster.

def postponed_sieve():                   # postponed sieve, by Will Ness      
    yield 2; yield 3; yield 5; yield 7;  # original code David Eppstein, 
    D = {}                               #            ActiveState Recipe 2002
    ps = (p for p in postponed_sieve())  # a separate Primes Supply:
    p = ps.next() and ps.next()          # (3) a Prime to add to dict
    q = p*p                              # (9) when its sQuare is 
    c = 9                                # the next Candidate
    while True:
        if c not in D:                # not a multiple of any prime seen so far:
            if c < q: yield c         #   a prime, or
            else:   # (c==q):         #   the next prime's square:
                add(D,c + 2*p,2*p)    #     (9+6,6 : 15,21,27,33,...)
                p=ps.next()           #     (5)
                q=p*p                 #     (25)
        else:                         # 'c' is a composite:
            s = D.pop(c)              #   step of increment
            add(D,c + s,s)            #   next multiple, same step
        c += 2                        # next odd candidate

def add(D,x,s):                          # make no multiple keys in Dict
    while x in D: x += s                 # increment by the given step
    D[x] = s                             

#                - base -             - postponed -
# 1500000                         13.28s-4.7   n^1.09 
# 1000000 10.83s-28.0  n^1.23      8.53s-4.7   n^1.08   test entry:
#  800000  8.23s-28.0  n^1.13      6.70s-4.7   n^1.09    http://ideone.com/WFv4f
#  400000  3.76s-15.8  n^1.11      3.14s-4.7   n^1.07
#  200000  1.74s-4.9MB             1.50s-4.7MB

see also http://stackoverflow.com/a/8871918/849891 for a related discussion.

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So, why stop hard-coding at prime = 9 and not at ... say 97? –  Hamish Grubijan May 24 '12 at 18:27
2  
9 of course is not a prime; but it is entirely arbitrary here where to start, as long as the initial state of the dict D is consistent with the starting candidate. The absolute minimum is yielding 3 and starting from c=5; I just wanted to delay the recursive call into postponed_sieve() in line # 5 for a little bit longer. –  Will Ness May 24 '12 at 21:49
2  
FYI This is not only very fast, but also very memory-efficient. For example, to find the first 1 million primes, the number of entries it puts to the 2 dicts it uses are 545 and 17. This is the best inplementation posted so far. –  pts Aug 2 '12 at 14:18
    
yes, that was the whole intention of it, to bring down the memory complexity of O(n) to O(sqrt(n)). it is better algorithmically; you probably could have more tweaking done on it to get some further improvement. –  Will Ness Aug 3 '12 at 7:48
2  
Thanks! I think I eventually got how it works! Here's the code with debug output for those who will struggle to understand it: ideone.com/n5PGu. And I only understood it when drew the generated primes on paper in colored pens. :o) –  ovgolovin Aug 31 '12 at 22:38
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This isn't originally my code, however, it's worth posting. The original can be found here: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/117119/

def gen_primes():
  D = {}
  q = 2  # first integer to test for primality.

  while True:
    if q not in D:
      # not marked composite, must be prime  
      yield q 

      #first multiple of q not already marked
      D[q * q] = [q] 
    else:
      for p in D[q]:
        D.setdefault(p + q, []).append(p)
      # no longer need D[q], free memory
      del D[q]

    q += 1

It's a generator, so use it like any other.

primes = gen_primes()
for p in primes:
  print p

It takes 1.62s to generate and put into a set, 1 million primes, on my desktop.

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4  
@Hamish: you want him to paste the first million primes here? Will a comment work for you? Hell, I'll do it just so you have to go through and check them. –  Roger Pate Feb 6 '10 at 4:41
3  
How does it scale? Please paste the first trillion primes here please. –  Beska Feb 6 '10 at 4:43
1  
@Beska: I'm more interested in the primes between two trillion and three trillion myself. Who would like to check em for me? –  D.Shawley Feb 6 '10 at 4:49
1  
Does anyone else here get the feeling that something fishy is going on here? "Post the primes man...it's cool...I don't want any trouble...just post the primes man..." –  Beska Feb 6 '10 at 5:05
1  
@Hamish: why don't you just run it yourself, take the primes and look at them at your leisure? (Rather than clogging up this question/answer with an enormous amount of senseless data.) –  Beska Feb 6 '10 at 5:06
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Do a segmented sieve, where the size of a segment is determined by available memory or the maximal size of a bitset.

For each segment represent the numbers in some interval [n; n + segment_size) as a bit set and sieve with all prime numbers below the square root of the upper bound.

Using a bit set uses less memory than a hash table or tree data structure, because you are working with dense sets of numbers.

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Got an implementation? –  Hamish Grubijan Feb 6 '10 at 14:44
    
You're right, segmented sieve seems to be the correct technical term. –  starblue May 24 '12 at 7:40
    
My implementation does something like a segmented sieve, but it uses two heaps instead of bitsets. stackoverflow.com/a/11759904/97248 –  pts Aug 1 '12 at 13:07
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This is similar but about 5% faster then erat2a.

import itertools as it
def erat2b( ):
    D = {  }
    yield 2
    for q in it.islice(it.count(3), 0, None, 2):
        p = D.pop(q, None)
        if p is None:
            D[q*q] = q
            yield q
        else:
            # Only this part is replaced.
            q += p
            while q in D:
                q += p
            D[q] = p
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this doesn't look right. can you show a link to the code on ideone.com or something? Did you use D[q*q] = 2*q in your actual code perhaps? –  Will Ness Aug 2 '12 at 10:52
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And another answer, more memory-efficient than my erat3 answer here:

import heapq

def heapprimegen():
    hp= []
    yield 2
    yield 3
    cn= 3
    nn, inc= 3, 6
    while 1:
        while cn < nn:
            yield cn
            heapq.heappush(hp, (3*cn, 2*cn))
            cn+= 2
        cn= nn+2
        nn, inc= heapq.heappushpop(hp, (nn+inc, inc))

It maintains a heap (a list) of prime multiples rather than a dictionary. It loses some speed, obviously.

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yield 3 is missing from here. –  pts Aug 1 '12 at 11:12
    
@pts: Thank you very much. –  tzot Aug 1 '12 at 12:09
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Here is a complicated heap-based implementation, which is not much faster than other heap-based implementations (see the speed comparison in another answer of mine), but it uses much less memory.

This implementation uses two heaps (tu and wv), which contain the same number elements. Each element is an int pair. In order to find all primes up to q**2 (where q is a prime), each heap will contain at most 2*pi(q-1) elements, where pi(x) is the number of positive primes not larger than x. So the total number of integers is at most 4*pi(floor(sqrt(n))). (We could gain a factor on 2 on memory by pushing half as much stuff to the heap, but that would make the algorithm slower.)

Other dict and heap-based approaches (e.g. erat2b, and heap_prime_gen_squares and heapprimegen) above store about `2*pi(n)' integers, because they extend their heap or dict every time they find a prime. As a comparison: to find the 1_000_000 primes, this implementation stores less than 4141 integers, other implementations store more than 1_000_000 integers.

import heapq

def heap_prime_gen_smallmem():
    yield 2
    yield 3
    f = 5
    fmar3 = 2
    q = 7
    q6 = 7 * 6
    qmar3 = 4
    tu = [(25, 30), (35, 30)]
    vw = [(25, 30), (35, 30)]
    while True:
        qmar3 += 2   
        if qmar3 == 6:  
            qb = q + 4
            q6b = q6 + 24
            qmar3 = 2
        else:
            qb = q + 2
            q6b = q6 + 12
        if q < tu[0][0]:
            d = q * q
            while f < d:
                a, b = vw[0]
                if f < a: 
                    yield f   
                else:
                    a, b = vw[0]
                    heapq.heapreplace(vw, (a + b, b))
                    a, b = vw[0]
                    while f >= a:
                        heapq.heapreplace(vw, (a + b, b))
                        a, b = vw[0]   
                fmar3 += 2
                if fmar3 == 6:
                    f += 4
                    fmar3 = 2
                else:
                    f += 2
            c = q * qb   
            heapq.heappush(tu, (d, q6))
            heapq.heappush(tu, (c, q6))
            heapq.heappush(vw, (d, q6))
            heapq.heappush(vw, (c, q6))
        else:
            a, b = tu[0]
            heapq.heapreplace(tu, (a + b, b))
            a, b = tu[0]  
            while q >= a:
                heapq.heapreplace(tu, (a + b, b))
                a, b = tu[0]
        q = qb
        q6 = q6b
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For posterity, here's a rewrite of Will Ness's beautiful algorithm for Python 3. Some changes are needed (iterators no longer have .next() methods, but there's a new next() builtin function). Other changes are for fun (using the new yield from <iterable> replaces four yield statements in the original. More are for readability (I'm not a fan of overusing ;-) 1-letter variable names).

It's significantly faster than the original, but not for algorithmic reasons. The speedup is mostly due to removing the original's add() function, doing that inline instead.

def psieve():
    import itertools
    yield from (2, 3, 5, 7)
    D = {}
    ps = psieve()
    next(ps)
    p = next(ps)
    assert p == 3
    psq = p*p
    for i in itertools.count(9, 2):
        if i in D:      # composite
            step = D.pop(i)
        elif i < psq:   # prime
            yield i
            continue
        else:           # composite, = p*p
            assert i == psq
            step = 2*p
            p = next(ps)
            psq = p*p
        i += step
        while i in D:
            i += step
        D[i] = step
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Here's a generator that's a little truer to how it's done in Haskell: filtering against composites of known primes, then adding the remaining primes to the list.

def gen_primes():
    primes = []
    i = 2
    while True:
        prime = True
        for p in primes:
            if not (i % p):
                prime = False
                break
        if prime:
            yield i
            primes.append(i)
        i += 1
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2  
This isn't necessarily efficient, but it's much like the Haskell one-line implementation of the Sieve of Eratosthenes. It is my code, and I just wrote it, so it may not work exactly as intended, but a quick test of it does generate the right sequence of primes. –  avpx Feb 6 '10 at 4:24
    
It did hang for me. What is the code to generate the first 100? –  Hamish Grubijan Feb 6 '10 at 4:30
    
That's weird. Works fine for me. Try this: primes = gen_primes() and then for i in xrange(100): print primes.next() –  avpx Feb 6 '10 at 5:30
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I wrote an article about an infinite primes generator some times ago:

http://stacktrace.it/2008/01/progetto-eulero-problema-3/

It's in Italian but you may have a pesky translation using Google: http://tinyurl.com/yzpyeom

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A quick comment on your article: prime factoring can be done without needing to generate any primes ahead of time: using another "every schoolkid knows" technique, starting with 2, divide out all 2's from N, then all 3's, 5's, 7's, 9's, etc. (just odds since all 2's were already divided out). I did this problem too on the euler site and used a prime generating sieve, but it's completely unnecessary. With this technique, any number you find which divides N is prime (a prime factor). –  Bogatyr Oct 21 '11 at 16:55
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Another way to do it:

import itertools
def primeseq():
    prime = [2]
    num = 0
    yield 2
    for i in itertools.count(3, 2):
        is_prime = True
        for num in prime:
            if i % num == 0:
                is_prime = False
                break
            elif num ** 2 > i: 
                break
        if is_prime:
            prime.append(i)
            yield i
share|improve this answer
    
this is optimal trial division algorithm. –  Will Ness Aug 2 '12 at 11:19
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Here is a simple but not terribly slow one using a heap instead of a dict:

import heapq

def heap_prime_gen_squares(): 
    yield 2  
    yield 3  
    h = [(9, 6)]
    n = 5
    while True:
        a, b = h[0]
        while n < a:
            yield n
            heapq.heappush(h, (n * n, n << 1))
            n += 2
        heapq.heapreplace(h, (a + b, b))  # Replace h[0], which is still (a, b).

My speed measurements of user time for the first 1 million primes (smaller numbers are better):

  • postponed_sieve (dict-based): 8.553s
  • erat2b (dict-based): 9.513s
  • erat2a (dict-based): 10.313s
  • heap_prime_gen_smallmem (heap-based): 23.935s
  • heap_prime_gen_squares (heap-based): 27.302s
  • heapprimegen (dict-based): 145.029s

So dict-based approaches seem to be the fastest.

share|improve this answer
    
why no data for postponed_sieve here? –  Will Ness Aug 2 '12 at 11:14
    
you say "faster" but the timings show it's much slower. faster than what, tzot's heapprimegen perhaps? this is confusing, because the answers show up here not in chronological order. :) It would be much clearer if you merged your three answers into one. –  Will Ness Aug 2 '12 at 11:29
    
@Will Ness: Thank you for your comments, I've updated my answer accordingly. And thank you for writing postponed_sieve. I won't merge my answers, because they are fundamentally different. –  pts Aug 2 '12 at 14:13
    
interesting, your time is almost exactly what I've got on ideone. How did you test your code? As for the sieve, I only amended it, the original is attributed in my answer. Although, the change is not trivial. –  Will Ness Aug 2 '12 at 14:41
    
I tested my code and code in other answers as well by generating the first 1 million primes, and comparing the output with my golden list of 1 million primes. –  pts Aug 3 '12 at 2:06
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