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I declared an enum in my implementation file as shown below, and declared a variable of that type in my interface as PlayerState thePlayerState; and used the variable in my methods. But I am getting errors stating that it is undeclared. How do I correctly declare and use a variable of type PlayerState in my methods?:

In the .m file

@implementation View1Controller

    typedef enum playerStateTypes
        {
            PLAYER_OFF,
            PLAYER_PLAYING,
            PLAYER_PAUSED
        } PlayerState;

in the .h file:

@interface View1Controller : UIViewController {

    PlayerState thePlayerState;

in some method in .m file:

-(void)doSomethin{

thePlayerState = PLAYER_OFF;

}
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2  
Now the type of the enum is thePlayerState. What does playerStateTypes become? –  Jim Thio Oct 11 '12 at 10:07
3  
For information about NS_ENUM and its latest modern syntax, see the posting NS_ENUM & NS_OPTIONS by Mattt Thompson. –  Basil Bourque Oct 22 '13 at 0:06
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6 Answers

up vote 54 down vote accepted

Your typedef needs to be in the header file (or some other file that's #imported into your header), because otherwise the compiler won't know what size to make the PlayerState ivar. Other than that, it looks ok to me.

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7  
+1. Anything you can do in C works in Objective-C. –  Carl Norum Feb 6 '10 at 4:43
    
The option to put it in a separate file seemed right in my case. I don't know if this is a good approach, but I needed to use the same enum in two different ViewControllers (self and it's delegate/datasource). Importing the header of the delegate/datasource resulted in an error and seems too much for a simple need. So I created a new .h file with the enum declared and imported it on both viewControllers.h file. Worked like a charm. –  Leandro Alves May 8 '12 at 17:12
3  
Should recommend to use the NS_ENUM macro - since this is best practice –  khebbie Jul 25 '13 at 11:25
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Apple has made some improvements to enums by using new c++ like enum styles. You could define an enum like this in your header, this has the benefit of providing better type checking and code completion.

typedef enum PlayerStateType : NSInteger PlayerStateType;
enum PlayerStateType : NSInteger {
  PlayerStateOff,
  PlayerStatePlaying,
  PlayerStatePaused
};

Apple also provides a macro to help provide better code compatibility. Using the macro looks like this.

typedef NS_ENUM(NSInteger, PlayerStateType) {
  PlayerStateOff,
  PlayerStatePlaying,
  PlayerStatePaused
};
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I've read in the NSHipster book that using the macro is best practice. However, I'm noticing that they are not auto completing. –  dotsConnect Dec 12 '13 at 3:17
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This is how Apple does it for classes like NSString:

In the header file:

enum {
    PlayerStateOff,
    PlayerStatePlaying,
    PlayerStatePaused
};

typedef NSInteger PlayerState;

Refer to Coding Guidelines at http://developer.apple.com/

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2  
This doesn't actually help the OP. While technically correct, it doesn't tell them how to create a reusable enum –  RyanR Jun 27 '11 at 16:49
13  
Linking to developer.apple.com is not real helpful. Is there some other place you'd like to cite instead? –  Brett Aug 13 '12 at 2:16
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With current projects you may want to use the NS_ENUM() or NS_OPTIONS() macros.

typedef NS_ENUM(NSUInteger, PlayerState) {
        PLAYER_OFF,
        PLAYER_PLAYING,
        PLAYER_PAUSED
    };
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1  
This nice post explains why: nshipster.com/ns_enum-ns_options –  smileyborg Feb 16 at 2:00
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In the .h:

typedef enum {
    PlayerStateOff,
    PlayerStatePlaying,
    PlayerStatePaused
} PlayerState;
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You can find an answer like this in other SO questions, but when I was reviewing enums, this question popped up first, so I added the answer here too. –  Ben Flynn Apr 3 '12 at 20:04
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I recommend using NS_OPTIONS or NS_ENUM. You can read more about it here: http://nshipster.com/ns_enum-ns_options/

Here's an example from my own code using NS_OPTIONS, I have an utility that sets a sublayer (CALayer) on a UIView's layer to create a border.

The h. file:

typedef NS_OPTIONS(NSUInteger, BSTCMBorder) {
    BSTCMBOrderNoBorder     = 0,
    BSTCMBorderTop          = 1 << 0,
    BSTCMBorderRight        = 1 << 1,
    BSTCMBorderBottom       = 1 << 2,
    BSTCMBOrderLeft         = 1 << 3
};

@interface BSTCMBorderUtility : NSObject

+ (void)setBorderOnView:(UIView *)view
                 border:(BSTCMBorder)border
                  width:(CGFloat)width
                  color:(UIColor *)color;

@end

The .m file:

@implementation BSTCMBorderUtility

+ (void)setBorderOnView:(UIView *)view
                 border:(BSTCMBorder)border
                  width:(CGFloat)width
                  color:(UIColor *)color
{

    // Make a left border on the view
    if (border & BSTCMBOrderLeft) {

    }

    // Make a right border on the view
    if (border & BSTCMBorderRight) {

    }

    // Etc

}

@end
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