Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is the code I have so far, which is a little messy since I am still trying to figure out how to set it up, but I cannot figure out how to get the output. This code is supposed to take a Taylor Series polynomial of an exponential, and check the amount of iterations it takes to get the approximation.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
/*Prototype for functions used*/
double factorial (int);

int main()
{
   double input = 0;
   double exp_val;
   double delta = 1;
   int f =0;
   int n = 0;
   double taylor;
   int total;
   printf("Plese enter the exponent to check for convergence:\n");
   scanf("%lf", &input);
   exp_val = exp(input);
   printf("  #     Iter      e^X      Sum     Diff\n");
   printf("----   ------   -------   -----  --------");

   while(delta > 0.00001)
   {
      f = factorial(n);
      taylor = ((pow(input,n))/ f);
      delta = (exp_val - taylor);
      printf("%d %f %f %f/n", (n+1), exp_val, taylor, delta);
      n++;
   }
   system("pause");


}

double factorial (int n)
{
  int r = 0;
  int sum = 1;
  int total = 0;
  if (n == 0)
    return total =1;
  else
  {
     for(r; r<n; r++)
     {
        sum = sum * r;
        total = sum + 1;

     }

     return total;
  }

}
share|improve this question
    
Presumably the value you're after is just n? –  Kerrek SB Mar 2 at 1:52
1  
1  
Also, your algorithm to compute the Taylor sum is very, very objectionable. Why are you doing all this work again and again and again? Be more lazy! Keep the running term around, and think about how one term differs from the previous one. –  Kerrek SB Mar 2 at 1:54
1  
How to compute the factorial of n when you know the factorial of n-1 (just multiple it by n! How to compute the value of x^n when you have x^(n-1) - multiple by x! Then just keep the numbers manageable so not overflow. They are like buses and like to be together –  Ed Heal Mar 2 at 2:21
1  
Your factorial function is weird... The sum is initially set to be 1, but provided that the n != 0, it will be multiplied by 0 on the first cycle, and will remain as 0 for the rest of the time; which means that the variable total will always have the same value of 0 + 1 = 1, if not still the initial value of 0. Long story short, the return value will always be 1.0 for that function. –  ThoAppelsin Mar 2 at 3:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here, I have fixed it, without changing your approach, except for the parts I really had to. One thing we have to clarify before the code is how Taylor Polynomials are made. It is not the first term plus the nth term, rather the sum of all terms from the first term till the nth term. So you definitely have to increase the taylor variable by the current nth term instead of the other way.

Here's the code, with brief comments in it as the explanation:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>

/*Prototype for functions used*/
unsigned long long factorial( int );    // <-- made it return unsigned long long

int main( )
{
    double input = 0;
    double exp_val;
    double delta = 1;
    unsigned long long f = 0;   // <-- changed its type
    int n = 0;
    double taylor = 0;  // <-- initialized with 0
    printf( "Plese enter the exponent to check for convergence:\n" );
    scanf( "%lf", &input );
    exp_val = exp( input );
    printf( " #          e^X            Sum           Diff\n" );        // <-- made some cosmetic changes
    printf( "---      ---------      ---------      ---------\n" );     // <-- added \n

    while ( delta > 0.00001 )
    {
        f = factorial( n );
        taylor += ( ( pow( input, n ) ) / f );  // += instead of =
        delta = ( exp_val - taylor );
        printf( "%2d    %12f   %12f   %12f\n", ( n + 1 ), exp_val, taylor, delta ); // <-- replaced / with \ before the n
        n++;                                                                        // and made some edits to make it look better
    }
    system( "pause" );
    return 0;           // <-- better add this
}

unsigned long long factorial( int n )   // <-- made it return unsigned long long
{
    int r = 0;
    unsigned long long sum = 1; // <-- changed its type
    if ( n == 0 )
        return sum; // <-- this
    else
    {
        for ( r; r<n; r++ )
        {
            sum *= r + 1;   // <-- changed this
        }

        return sum; // <-- and this
    }
}

You have to keep in mind that you may not input too high values to it. Anything higher than input == 4 kind of breaks it, because, you see, even with 4, it can reduce the error delta beneath the threshold first only with the 19th cycle. The programme seemingly fails with n == 5 due to inaccurate calculation of pow( 5, 21 ) / factorial( 21 ) when n reaches 21:

0.000034    // the result this programme finds
0.0000093331055943447405008542892329719 // the result Calculator finds

So, yeah... If you want this programme to work with bigger input values, you'll need a better approach. Not calculating the nth term from scratch and calculating it from the (n - 1)th term instead could help until somewhat bigger input values, as the others had said.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that makes alot of sense now that I am looking at it. –  user3259144 Mar 2 at 17:12

A couple issue:

  1. Change int r = 0; ... for(r; r<n; r++) to int r; ... for(r=1; r<=n; r++) or int r = 1; ... for(; r<=n; r++)

  2. Change printf("%d %f %f %f/n" to printf("%d %f %f %f\n" Add \n

  3. Change "... --------" to "... --------\n"

  4. Change delta = (exp_val - taylor); to delta = fabs(exp_val - taylor);

  5. Change to double taylor = 0.0; Initialize it.

  6. Change to taylor += ((pow(input,n))/ f); Note: +=

  7. Minor: "Please" not "Plese".

  8. Minor: Drop int total;

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.