Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make an algorithm that finds the best position to insert the target into the already sorted array.

The goal is to either return the position of the item if it exists in the list, else return the position it would go into to keep the list sorted.

So say I have a list:

   0   1   2   3   4    5    6
 ---------------------------------
 | 1 | 2 | 4 | 9 | 10 | 39 | 100 |
 ---------------------------------

And my target item is 14 It should return an index position of 5

Pseudo-code I currently have:

array = generateSomeArrayOfOrderedNumbers()

number findBestIndex(target, start, end)
    mid = abs(end - start) / 2

    if (mid < 2) 
        // Not really sure what to put here
        return start + 1 // ??

    if (target < array[mid])
        // The target belongs on the left side of our list //
        return findBestIndex(target, start, mid - 1)
    else
        // The target belongs on the right side of our list //
        return findBestIndex(target, mid + 1, end)

I not really sure what to put at this point. I tried to take a binary search approach to this, but this is the best I could come up with after 5 rewrites or so.

share|improve this question
7  
Binary search is the way to go - that is all you need. You do not need to use recursion, a simple while loop will do. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 2 '14 at 3:37
    
Your recursion will be greatly simplified if you check to see if array[mid] == target, and if so terminate by returning the index. You also need to figure out your base cases. In recursion, base cases are always the hardest part. –  ldog Mar 2 '14 at 4:29
    
@ldog: That actually complicates the code (an additional if). Just have your base case at start > end and recurse into [start, mid] or [mid + 1, end] depending on the comparison. Remember that we don't want to find target, we want to find the successor of target. –  Niklas B. Mar 2 '14 at 4:30
    
@NiklasB.: I thought that if target exists, we want to return its index. Thats the reason why I suggested having a special check for that. Otherwise we can find the successor as you suggest. See linwei's answer which I think should be correct. –  ldog Mar 2 '14 at 4:34
    
Why this question is tagged as linked-list? Is the structure an array or linked list? Is it's linked list then binary search won't help, as you need random access to benefit from binary search, which linked list doesn't have. –  justhalf Mar 2 '14 at 5:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's several problems with your code:

mid = abs(end - start) / 2

This is not the middle between start and end, it's half the distance between them (rounded down to an integer). Later you use it like it was indeed a valid index:

findBestIndex(target, start, mid - 1)

Which it is not. You probably meant to use mid = (start + end) // 2 or something here. You also miss a few indices because you skip over the mid:

return findBestIndex(target, start, mid - 1)
 ...
return findBestIndex(target, mid + 1, end)

Your base case must now be expressed a bit differently as well. A good candidate is the condition

if start == end

Because now you definitely know you're finished searching. Note that you also should consider the case where all the array elements are smaller than target, so you need to insert it at the end.

I don't often search binary, but if I do, this is how

Binary search is something that is surprisingly hard to get right if you've never done it before. I usually use the following pattern if I do a binary search:

lo, hi = 0, n // [lo, hi] is the search range, but hi will never be inspected.
while lo < hi:
    mid = (lo + hi) // 2
    if check(mid): hi = mid
    else:          lo = mid + 1

Under the condition that check is a monotone binary predicate (it is always false up to some point and true from that point on), after this loop, lo == hi will be the first number in the range [0..n] with check(lo) == true. check(n) is implicitely assumed to be true (that's part of the magic of this approach).

So what is a monotone predicate that is true for all indices including and after our target position and false for all positions before?

If we think about it, we want to find the first number in the array that is larger than our target, so we just plug that in and we're good to go:

lo, hi = 0, n
while lo < hi:
    mid = (lo + hi) // 2
    if (a[mid] > target): hi = mid
    else:                 lo = mid + 1
return lo;
share|improve this answer
    
+1, some people are usually struggling because of using closed intervals, in most cases half open intervals are much easier to use and result in more elegant code like in this case. –  pasztorpisti Mar 2 '14 at 4:09
    
@pasztorpisti: I have to disagree with you on that point, this code actually does not work with half-open intervals and that's what makes it elegant. The loop invariant is that the first element is in the closed range [lo..hi], with the special case where hi == n. Otherwise the loop condition would be while (lo + 1 < hi) or something. –  Niklas B. Mar 2 '14 at 4:14
    
I didn't say that your code doesn't work with half open intervals. –  pasztorpisti Mar 2 '14 at 4:16
    
@pasztorpisti: yeah I just wanted to make you aware that using closed intervals is what makes this algorithm elegant. It's a bit less elegant with exclusive right border. –  Niklas B. Mar 2 '14 at 4:20
    
This may be a dumb question, but say I have a list of 7 integers. They are added in the following order 1, 6, 3, 5, 4, 7, 2. In my implementation, everything goes great, until I reach 7. The order after inserting them all is: 1, 2, 3, 7, 4, 5, 6. Is there anything im missing in regards to this code. This is the code: gist.github.com/headdetect/b8a889075198578ccb46 –  Brayden Mar 2 '14 at 4:31

You are on the right track.

First, you do not need abs in mid = abs(end + start) / 2

Assume abs here means absolute value, because end should always be no less than start, unless there is some mistake in your code. So here abs never helps but may be potentially hiding your problem make it hard to debug.

You do not need if (mid < 2) section either , nothing special about mid smaller than two.

array = generateSomeArrayOfOrderedNumbers()

int start = 0;
int end = array.size(); 

int findBestIndex(target, start, end){

if (start == end){   //you already searched entire array, return the position to insert
  if (stat == 0) return 0; // if it's  the beginning of the array just return 0.
  if(array[start] > target) return start -1; //if last searched index is bigger than target return the position before it.
else return start;
}
mid = (end - start) / 2

// find correct position 
if(target == array[mid]) return mid;

if (target < array[mid])
{
 // The target belongs on the left side of our list //
return findBestIndex(target, start, mid - 1)
}
else
{
 // The target belongs on the right side of our list //
 return findBestIndex(target, mid + 1, end)
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean mid = (start + end) / 2 –  Niklas B. Mar 2 '14 at 5:01
    
yes. LOL! I copied from his question did not even realize that. –  Leo Mar 2 '14 at 9:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.