Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to export one of my Processing sketches into gif form, and am using extrapixel's Gif-animation library (http://extrapixel.github.io/gif-animation/) to do so.

I am able to export the correct number of frames, but they all appear to be empty.
Any ideas why this is happening?

import gifAnimation.*;

GifMaker gifExport;

float angle = 0.1;

void setup() {
  size(500, 500);
  smooth();
  noStroke();
  background(0);

  frameRate(12);
  gifExport = new GifMaker(this, "spin rect sine growth.gif");
  gifExport.setRepeat(0); // make it an "endless" animation
  gifExport.setTransparent(255); // make white the transparent color -- match browser bg color
}

void draw() {

  float size = map(sin(angle),-1,1,0,height);
  rectMode(CENTER);
  translate(width/2, height/2);
  rotate(angle);
  noStroke();
  fill(255,255);
  rect(0,0, size, size);
  angle += 0.0523 ;

  noStroke();
  fill( 0, 15);
  rect(0, 0, width, height);

  gifExport.setDelay(0);  //maybe no delay?
  gifExport.addFrame();

  if (frameCount == 120) gifExport.finish();  
}
share|improve this question
    
I feel that I should perhaps apologize for asking a question when using a specific library -- that this may make my whole post too specific. I am sorry if so –  Matt Voda Mar 2 at 5:57
    
When you say appear empty, do you mean white? On a white background? –  Lain Mar 2 at 14:22
    
Why are you using gifExport.setDelay(0);? Don't you want a small delay between frames of the gif? –  kevinsa5 Mar 2 at 18:49
    
I'm embarrassed to admit that I only included gifExport.setDelay(0) in an attempt to mimic the sample code included with the library. –  Matt Voda Mar 3 at 2:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Kevin's suggestion is good. If you are setting the frame rate to 12 perhaps you should also set the the delay to 1000/12.

import gifAnimation.*;

GifMaker gifExport;

float angle = 0.1;

void setup() {
  size(500, 500);
  smooth();
  noStroke();
  background(0);

  frameRate(12);
  gifExport = new GifMaker(this, "spin rect sine growth.gif");
  gifExport.setRepeat(0); // make it an "endless" animation
  gifExport.setTransparent(255); // make white the transparent color -- match browser bg color
  gifExport.setDelay(1000/12);  //12fps in ms

}

void draw() {

  float size = map(sin(angle),-1,1,0,height);
  rectMode(CENTER);
  translate(width/2, height/2);
  rotate(angle);
  noStroke();
  fill(255,255);
  rect(0,0, size, size);
  angle += 0.0523 ;

  noStroke();
  fill( 0, 15);
  rect(0, 0, width, height);

  gifExport.addFrame();

  if (frameCount == 120) gifExport.finish();  
}

I've tested and it seems to work just fine:

gif small preview

In a way the gifAnimation library is handy because it deals with encoding frames for you but notice there are a few glitchy frames here and there.

If you want total control of your frames you can export an image sequence and use something like Image Magick to convert the sequence to a gif. There a few advantages I can think off:

  1. If you save the frames in separate threads, your export will be faster/won't affect the Processing's main animation thread as much
  2. Your frames will be crisp (given you're saving without much compression, for this png works best)
  3. Depending on your animation content you can optimize your gif so it's more web/device friendly when loading.

Here's another gif with no glitches:

small gif no glitches

It has been exporting using this code:

float angle = 0.1;

void setup() {
  size(500, 500);
  smooth();
  noStroke();
  background(0);

  frameRate(12);
}

void draw() {

  float size = map(sin(angle),-1,1,0,height);
  rectMode(CENTER);
  translate(width/2, height/2);
  rotate(angle);
  noStroke();
  fill(255,255);
  rect(0,0, size, size);
  angle += 0.0523 ;

  noStroke();
  fill( 0, 15);
  rect(0, 0, width, height);

  if(frameCount <= 120){
    TImage frame = new TImage(width,height,RGB,sketchPath("frame_"+nf(frameCount,3)+".png"));
    frame.set(0,0,get());
    frame.saveThreaded();
  }
}
class TImage extends PImage implements Runnable{//separate thread for saving images
  String filename;

  TImage(int w,int h,int format,String filename){
    this.filename = filename;
    init(w,h,format);
  }

  public void saveThreaded(){
    new Thread(this).start();
  }

  public void run(){
    this.save(filename);
  }

}

And the image sequence was converted by navigating to the sketch folder and running

convert *.png spin_anim.gif

If you simply want to resize it:

convert spin_anim.gif -resize 100x100 spin_anim_small.gif

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
This was an excellent, helpful comment. Thank you very much for the advice to export an image sequence, and create a gif from that. I checked out ImageMagick, but because the command line still intimidates me, I'm compiling it in Photoshop. –  Matt Voda Mar 3 at 3:35
    
If you have the time, would you mind walking me through exactly what is happening in the final if-statement and the TImage class? I am not familiar with the concept of a thread (outside of online forums and email/messaging). –  Matt Voda Mar 3 at 3:37
    
Glad it helps. Tricky to explain at novice level in a few words: First interfaces. They are like agreements: an interface just has method/function signatures, but no actual implementation. It's up to the class which implements/agrees with the interface to supply an implementation(actually do something). In TImage's case Runnable is an interface the java language already defines and it means anything implementing this must supply a public void run() method. This works hand in hand with the Thread class, because you can can instantiate a thread from any instance that implements Runnable... –  George Profenza Mar 3 at 12:07
    
...and that's what creates a new thread so when saveThreaded() is called, that will not run in the main Processing animation thread. If it were (you would see the animation stall more because it has to wait for the bytes of the image to be written on disk). Back to the final if-statement: if 120 frames haven't passed yet: create a new TImage (which is just like PImage, but saves in a separate thread), so pass w,h,RGB just like you do with createImage(), but also passs the filename (which will be used in the run() call). get() with no arguments gets a screenshot as a PImage and ... –  George Profenza Mar 3 at 12:11
    
...PImage's set(0,0,PImageInstance) simply copies pixels from an image, so essentially we're creating a blank image and copying pixels from what Processing just rendered. Finally we call the the saveThreaded() method, which creates a new thread. When start gets call, that also calls run which saves the file. HTH –  George Profenza Mar 3 at 12:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.