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I'm having difficulty using fscanf to read character strings from a file and print the number of letters in each string. The file looks like this:

ACGTTTTAAGGGCTGAGCTAGTCAGTTCATCGCGCGCGTATATCCTCGATCGATCATTCTCTCTAGACGTT ACGTTTTAAGGGCTTAGAGCTTATGCTAATCGCGCGCGTATATCCTCGATCGATCATTCTCTCTAGACGTT TCGTTTGAAGGGCTTAGTTAGTTAGTTCATCGGCGGCGTATATCCTCGATCGATCATTCTCTCTAGACGTT //end of file

(each line in the file is a separate string, with the max number of characters in each string being 241)

This is what I have tried but it doesn't seem to be working:

include <stdio.h>
FILE *input;

int main ()

{

  int i=0, count=0;

  char sequence[241];

  /*reads DNA sequence from input, stores it in an array, and returns the # of                 
  letters read as an int */

  input=fopen("dna_input.dat", "r");

  while (fscanf(input, "%c", &sequence[i++]) != EOF)     
     count++;

  printf ("The number of letters in a sequence is: %d\n", count);

  return 0;    
}
share|improve this question
    
while loop is taking in \n as part of the sequence. Use fgets(). –  chux Mar 2 at 6:02
    
fscanf returns the number of input items assigned, not an EOF indicator. Besides, if all you're trying to do is read a line from the file, try fgets, and then use strlen on the result. –  pat Mar 2 at 6:03
    
Why so read character by character? Read whole string and find length of it. –  Jayesh Mar 2 at 6:03
    
What is your objective, do you want to print the file/ you want to read the file line by line or charcater by character please sepcify?? –  akm Mar 2 at 6:04
    
Sorry for the confusion. This function is part of a different program that I am trying to debug. The actual function declaration in my other program is: int read_DNA(char sequence[]). The objective is to read a "DNA" sequence from the input file, store it in the array sequence[] and return the number of letters read. –  user3303851 Mar 2 at 6:12

4 Answers 4

There's nothing in your code that recognizes the end of a line -- only the end of the file. Also, you're reading the whole file into a buffer that's only big enough for one line. And, did you intend to print the results for each line, or only for the whole file? Because it's doing the latter (if it doesn't crash from the buffer overflow first).

Assuming per line:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    FILE *input;
    char sequence[242];

    input = fopen("dna_input.dat", "r");
    while (fgets(sequence, 242, input) != NULL)
    {
        printf("The number of letters in a sequence is: %d\n",
               strlen(sequence) - 1); /* don't count trailing \n */
    }
    fclose(input);
    return 0;
}

Yeah, sorry, I didn't find a use for fscanf() here. :)

share|improve this answer
    
#include <strlen.h>? –  ajay Mar 2 at 8:13
    
Braino -- string.h (for strlen) –  William McBrine Mar 2 at 9:52

A little bit of change to your code that reads characters and processes them:

#include <stdio.h>
FILE *input;

int main ()

{

  int i=0, count=0;

  char sequence[241];

  /*reads DNA sequence from input, stores it in an array, and returns the # of                 
  letters read as an int */

  input=fopen("dna_input.dat", "r");

  int c ;
  while ( (c = fgetc(input) != EOF))
  {
     if ( c != '\n')
     {
        sequence[i++] = c;
        count++;
     }
     else
     {
        printf ("The number of letters in a sequence is: %d\n", count);

        /* Terminate the sequence with a null character */
        sequence[i] = '\0';

        /* Reset the counters */
        i = 0;
        count = 0;
     }
  }

  /* Take care of the last line if it does not end in a newline character */
  if ( count > 0 )
  {
     printf ("The number of letters in a sequence is: %d\n", count);
  }

  return 0;    
}

Also, if you want sequence to be a null terminated string, you may want to create it as an array of 242 characters, with the last one being used to store the terminating null character.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the last line is does not contain a terminating newline character? This will print only up till the second last line in the file. –  ajay Mar 2 at 9:52
    
@ajay Good observation. Let me edit the answer to address that. –  R Sahu Mar 2 at 19:41

The main problem here is that fscanf does not return the character it read, and so it will never return EOF. Also, something to keep in mind is that newline (\n) is counted as a character, so you may need to filter that out. Another safer alternative is to just use fgets() to read your input:

fgets() instruction manual

Edit: since you were wondering in the comments, one thing that you need to know is how strings are structured. A string is an array of chars that end with a 0 aka '\0' (not to be confused with '0'). The way to manually find the length of the string would be to do this:

char *str = "Hello, world!";
int len = 0;
while (str[len] != 0)
    len++;

Essentially what you are doing is looping through the string, and every time you reach a character that isn't zero you increment length and when you reach one that is 0, you stop. Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I am using fgets() now instead of fscanf(), but I am still not sure how to successfully print the number of letters read per line. This is part of an assignment and I am not allowed to use strlen. –  user3303851 Mar 2 at 6:40
    
You should know the C string structure before doing. Just find the null terminated byte, that's the end of the string –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Mar 2 at 6:59
    
@user3303851 I just added a part about strings and their length –  ASKASK Mar 2 at 9:00

fscanf returns the number of items successfully matched and assigned, which can be fewer than provided for, or even zero in the case of an early matching failure. However, it returns EOF if the end of input is reached before either the first successful conversion or a matching failure occurs. Also, the %c conversion specifier in the format string matches all characters including whitespaces.

The above two features of fscanf mean that your while loop condition will be false only when fscanf has reached the end of the file but before that it would probably overrun the buffer pointed to by sequence if the file has more than 241 characters. This is undefined behaviour and would most likely cause segfault.

You should be using fgets instead. fgets also reads a newline character and stores it in the buffer if it encounters one, before returning. All lines in the file will be newline terminated except the last line which may not contain a terminating newline. Also you should check for file I/O error.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    int len; 
    char sequence[241 + 1]; // +1 for the terminating null byte
    FILE *input = fopen("dna_input.dat", "r");
    if(input == NULL) {     
        printf("Error in opening the file\n");
        return -1;
    }
    while(fgets(sequence, 242, input) != NULL) {
        len = strlen(sequence);
        if(sequence[len-1] == '\n')
            --len;
        printf("The number of letters in the sequence is: %d\n", len);
    }
    fclose(input);
    return 0;
}
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