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I'm trying to make a Trie data structure (school work) and I'm using a list which I've also made myself and works fine (tested) to store the N-nodes in the Trie.

Anyway, the problem is, every node is supposed to store a list of nodes so I can make my N-ary tree/trie but I've hit a snag...

When I'm debugging and going through the for loop, I can see that the currentNode is getting deeper into my tree just fine. However, when I look at it from the perspective of the root, my root only has one linked list containing the first node made in the first iteration of the loop. The consecutive iterations don't register in the NODE in the BRANCH of the ROOT NODE... but it's working in the currentNode, as if they are separate copies even though the currentNode is a pointer to the correct (I hope) node.

Is there something wrong with my code?!? Am I misunderstanding how pointers work?? Help! Thanks.

My node struct.

struct Node {
    char         letter;
    ItemType     item;
    List<Node> * branches;
};

Node * root;
int    size;

My put function.

ItemType put(KeyType newKey, ItemType newItem) {
    Node * currentNode = root;
    if (isEmpty()) {

        //So build a new key
        for (int levelIndex = 1; ((int) (newKey.length()) - levelIndex) >= 0; ++levelIndex) {
            currentNode->branches = new List<Node>;
            Node * tempNode = new Node;
            tempNode->letter = newKey.at(levelIndex - 1);
            currentNode->branches->add(*tempNode);
            currentNode = tempNode;
        }
        //Store
        currentNode->item = newItem;
        ++size;
        return NULL; //The former item.

    } else {
        //Begin
        return puttanesca(newKey, newItem, *(currentNode->branches), 1, 1);
    }
}

Edit: Oh sorrry, I forgot to pention that puttanesca is a recursive function I'm using to do the traversing and placing of the nodes and stuff. But I haven't really gotten to test that yet, I'm stuck here just trying to add the first key into my empty Trie because of this problem...

More Edits:

Here is puttanesca, I don't think it has anything to do with the problem though but... this is it anyway.

I'm in the midst of changing the List pointer in the Node struct to just an object so some of this stuff might look wrong or it might just be wrong to begin with because I'm not very good with C++ and I've still got problems here but the general concept/algorithm can be seen... Oh and I'm using typedef string KeyType for my key just for some future proofing and a template for ItemType.

ItemType puttanesca(KeyType newKey, ItemType newItem, List<Node> & tempList, int listIndex, int levelIndex) {
    Node currentNode = tempList.get(listIndex);

    //Am I at the right node? (searching)
    if (newKey.at(levelIndex - 1) == currentNode.letter) { //Yes, I am.
        //Is this a leaf node?
        if (currentNode.branches == NULL) {

            //Key does not already exist
            if (newKey.length() != levelIndex) {
                //So build a new key
                for (; ((int) (newKey.length()) - levelIndex) >= 0; ++levelIndex) {
                    currentNode.branches = new List<Node>;
                    Node * tempNode = new Node;
                    tempNode->letter = newKey.at(levelIndex - 1);
                    currentNode.branches.add(*tempNode);
                    currentNode = *tempNode;
                }
                //Store
                currentNode.item = newItem;
                ++size;
                return NULL; //The former item.

            } else { //Key matched!
                //Replace with new item
                ItemType currentItem = currentNode.item;
                currentNode.item = newItem;
                return currentItem; //which is actually the now old item after the previous statement
            }
        } else { //Not a leaf, keep going
            //Go to the next level and start from the first index
            ItemType currentItem = puttanesca(newKey, newItem, currentNode.branches, 1, levelIndex + 1);
            if (currentItem == NULL) {
                //Key found to be inexistant
                //So build a new key - create new sibling
                Node * tempNode = new Node;
                tempNode->letter = newKey.at(levelIndex - 1);
                currentNode.branches.add(*tempNode);
                currentNode = *tempNode;

                //Continue building key - extend sibling
                for (++levelIndex; ((int) (newKey.length()) - levelIndex) >= 0; ++levelIndex) {
                    currentNode.branches = new List<Node>;
                    Node * tempNode = new Node;
                    tempNode->letter = newKey.at(levelIndex - 1);
                    currentNode.branches.add(*tempNode);
                    currentNode = *tempNode;
                }
                //Store
                currentNode.item = newItem;
                ++size;
                return NULL; //The former item

            } else {
                return currentItem; //The former item;
            }
        }
    } else { //Wrong node
        if (tempList.getLength() > listIndex) {
            return puttanesca(newKey, newItem, tempList, ++listIndex, levelIndex);

        } else {//End of the line, chump
            return NULL; //Tell parent you failed
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
What is puttanesca() and why are you using a custom List instead of std::list? BTW, there's no need to have pointer to a list and dynamically allocate it. Using a normal list object would be easier to work with. –  Max Shawabkeh Feb 6 '10 at 8:11
    
Oh yes... I'm using a custom List because we're required to do so... It's the assignment's requirements, were not allowed to use those abstract data types from the standard library. Um... what you're saying is that I should make List<Node> * branches just List<Node> branches right? –  Dois Feb 6 '10 at 8:19
1  
Regarding converting List<Node> * to List<Node>, yes. You don't need any dynamicity there. You still need to show us the definition of puttanesca() though. –  Max Shawabkeh Feb 6 '10 at 8:36
    
Well I was using pointers because I wanted to check if the pointer was NULL in puttanesca but I guess theres no need for pointers and that it's just my lack of experience with C++(?) anyway, I'm going to put puttanesca up then. It's quite long though. –  Dois Feb 6 '10 at 8:41
    
What does isEmpty() check? –  Timo Geusch Feb 6 '10 at 9:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is here: currentNode->branches->add(*tempNode);

You are inserting a copy of tempNode, not tempNode itself. You might want to consider using List<Node *> branches instead of List<Node> branches;

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow... I see, I've totally missed that. Thank you for your infinite wisdom, that was really driving me nuts. As a... "side-question", NULL is really just #define NULL 0 right? So if I want to check if a node is non-existant, I can't use NULL unless I use pointers can I? If I can't use NULL, how is it normally done (or is it normally done with pointers?) Thanks again! –  Dois Feb 6 '10 at 14:10
1  
It's normally done with pointers. And NULL is a #define; the universal symbol for a null pointer is 0 (or nullptr in C++0x) –  MSN Feb 6 '10 at 15:14
    
Alright... thanks. –  Dois Feb 6 '10 at 15:59

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