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I have a simple login and registration form, with some extra insert and select queries for various different things.

I have completed this tutorial (http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/real-world-oop-with-php-and-mysql--net-1918) which is to create a PHP class that supposedly makes it easier to select, insert, disconnect, update, to a MySQL server.

The thing is, now that I have done the tutorial and have started to implement some of the changes from the static select and insert queries to the new one that refers to functions inside the class, I am seeing that the new code is longer and more complicated, which I feel beats the objective of the class.

Any thoughts and suggestions?

For example, a general insert query goes:

mysqli_query("INSERT INTO statuses(User_ID, Status)VALUES('$userid', '$statusupdate')") or die(myself_error());

Yet, the tutorial mentioned above required the following:

$db->insert('mysqlcrud',array(3,"Name 4","this@wasinsert.ed<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
(function(){try{var s,a,i,j,r,c,l,b=document.getElementsByTagName("script");l=b[b.length-1].previousSibling;a=l.getAttribute('data-cfemail');if(a){s='';r=parseInt(a.substr(0,2),16);for(j=2;a.length-j;j+=2){c=parseInt(a.substr(j,2),16)^r;s+=String.fromCharCode(c);}s=document.createTextNode(s);l.parentNode.replaceChild(s,l);}}catch(e){}})();
/* ]]> */
</script>"));

The class file shows :

    <?php
/**
 * Created by PhpStorm.
 * User: marshall
 * Date: 01/03/14
 * Time: 21:34
 */

namespace MySQL\lib;


class Database {


        private $db_host = 'localhost';
        private $db_user = 'root';
        private $db_pass = 'pass';
        private $db_name = 'database';


    public function connect() {
        if(!$this->con) {
            $myconn = mysql_connect($this->db_host, $this->db_user, $this->db_pass);
            if(myconn) {
                $seldb = mysql_select_db($this->db_name,$myconn);
                if($seldb) {
                    $this->con = true;
                    return true;
                } else {
                    return false;
                }
            } else {
                return false;
            }
        } else {
            return true;
        }
        }

    public function disconnect() {
        if($this->con)
        {
            if(mysql_close())
            {
                $this->con = false;
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    private $result = array();

    private function tableExists($table)
    {
        $tablesInDb = mysql_query('SHOW TABLES FROM '.$this->db_name.' LIKE "'.$table.'"');
        if($tablesInDb)
        {
            if(mysql_num_rows($tablesInDb)==1)
            {
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }


    public function select($table, $rows = '*', $where = null, $order = null)
    {
        $q = 'SELECT '.$rows.' FROM '.$table;
        if($where != null)
            $q .= ' WHERE '.$where;
        if($order != null)
            $q .= ' ORDER BY '.$order;
        if($this->tableExists($table))
       {
        $query = mysql_query($q);
        if($query)
        {
            $this->numResults = mysql_num_rows($query);
            for($i = 0; $i < $this->numResults; $i++)
            {
                $r = mysql_fetch_array($query);
                $key = array_keys($r);
                for($x = 0; $x < count($key); $x++)
                {
                    // Sanitizes keys so only alphavalues are allowed
                    if(!is_int($key[$x]))
                    {
                        if(mysql_num_rows($query) > 1)
                            $this->result[$i][$key[$x]] = $r[$key[$x]];
                        else if(mysql_num_rows($query) < 1)
                            $this->result = null;
                        else
                            $this->result[$key[$x]] = $r[$key[$x]];
                    }
}
}
return true;
}
else
    {
        return false;
    }
}
else
return false;
}
    public function insert($table,$values,$rows = null)
    {
        if($this->tableExists($table))
        {
            $insert = 'INSERT INTO '.$table;
            if($rows != null)
            {
                $insert .= ' ('.$rows.')';
            }

            for($i = 0; $i < count($values); $i++)
            {
                if(is_string($values[$i]))
                    $values[$i] = '"'.$values[$i].'"';
            }
            $values = implode(',',$values);
            $insert .= ' VALUES ('.$values.')';
            $ins = mysql_query($insert);
            if($ins)
            {
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }



    public function delete($table,$where = null)
    {
        if($this->tableExists($table))
        {
            if($where == null)
            {
                $delete = 'DELETE '.$table;
            }
            else
            {
                $delete = 'DELETE FROM '.$table.' WHERE '.$where;
            }
            $del = mysql_query($delete);

            if($del)
            {
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }


    public function update($table,$rows,$where)
    {
        if($this->tableExists($table))
        {
            // Parse the where values
            // even values (including 0) contain the where rows
            // odd values contain the clauses for the row
            for($i = 0; $i < count($where); $i++)
            {
                if($i%2 != 0)
                {
                    if(is_string($where[$i]))
                    {
                        if(($i+1) != null)
                            $where[$i] = '"'.$where[$i].'" AND ';
                        else
                            $where[$i] = '"'.$where[$i].'"';
                    }
                }
            }
            $where = implode('=',$where);


            $update = 'UPDATE '.$table.' SET ';
            $keys = array_keys($rows);
            for($i = 0; $i < count($rows); $i++)
            {
                if(is_string($rows[$keys[$i]]))
                {
                    $update .= $keys[$i].'="'.$rows[$keys[$i]].'"';
                }
                else
                {
                    $update .= $keys[$i].'='.$rows[$keys[$i]];
                }

                // Parse to add commas
                if($i != count($rows)-1)
                {
                    $update .= ',';
                }
            }
            $update .= ' WHERE '.$where;
            $query = mysql_query($update);
            if($query)
            {
                return true;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    public function getResult()
    {
        return $this->result;
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
the code of the class might be longer and complicated but that will definitely simplify the process when you actually start using the class object in your code –  anurupr Mar 2 at 13:47
    
Please share your code. Maybe you need to create new methods in existing classes... And, yes object oriented approach should show its advantages in more complicated things... –  nevermind Mar 2 at 13:49
    
What's with the JavaScript in your second snippet? Is it there by accident? –  Alessandro Desantis Mar 2 at 14:14
    
That is just in the tutorial, I have no idea how the tutorials' insert method works, but I DO understand how the normal MySQLi insert query works. –  Marshiewooooooo Mar 2 at 14:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It all depends on the size of your application: if it's simple there's no need to abstract database queries and you can just use PDO or a similar library to access your database.

However, if the code base grows larger, you might need an ORM that handles the records and their relationships for you.

One famous PHP ORM is Doctrine. It follows the Repository Pattern, which means that your records are little more than collections of getters and setters, and all the logic (querying, insertion etc.) is done using another object. For instance:

$user = new User();
$user
  ->setName('John Doe')
  ->setUsername('j.doe')
  ->setPassword('random123')
;

$em = $doctrine->getEntityManager();

$em->persist($user);
$em->flush();

Propel, on the other hand, uses the Active Record Pattern, where your entity classes are also used to handle querying and persistence. For example:

$user = new User();
$user
  ->setName('John Doe')
  ->setUsername('j.doe')
  ->setPassword('random123')
;
$user->save();

Which pattern to choose is mainly a matter of subjective preference.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks for your answer, I have edited my original question. As you can see the difference in the code, I am still curious if the tutorial I originally followed is a good example of a MySQL query class. –  Marshiewooooooo Mar 2 at 14:11
1  
For completeness, it might be worth adding here that Doctrine is just one example of an ORM, for one language. In PHP, Propel is another one, and many frameworks (such as Cake and Laravel) offer their own integrated ORM. –  halfer Mar 2 at 17:06
1  
@halfer: Thanks, I've updated my answer. –  Alessandro Desantis Mar 2 at 17:19
    
@Marshiewooooooo: as for the correctness of the Database class, I'm no OOP expert, but it seems to me it's just a bunch of doubtfully useful functions put together in the same class. Plus, it uses the deprecated mysql extension. –  Alessandro Desantis Mar 2 at 17:25

Using a class for the database will reduce extra bit of writing code to get records from tables, however it is not necessary to use the class functions for insert and retrieve data from tables.

You can use mysqli_fetch_assoc() and mysqli_query() in PHP to insert and retrieve data from tables. There is no performance issue in either case.

share|improve this answer
3  
The mysql extension is old and has been deprecated as of PHP 5.5. New applications should NOT rely on it. –  Alessandro Desantis Mar 2 at 13:49

Why dont you just simply use some simple ORM library ?

You know the ORM concept is so easy that I can write ORM library now on the fly during this answer. : D

So let us try.

But before we write it we must know some basic concepts or some basic terminology about ORM related subjects. In this example we will have:

  1. ORM library - With all good things ORM library takes responsibility to take care about server connections and server connection abstractions. (Main goal of ORM is to map classes to actual tables, but we will return to this later).

  2. Data layer - This is actual part of ORM in this example we will separate it from ORM to see what it does. This part is responsible for mapping classes to tables. For example data access layer knows how to save specific class object to actual table and how to load specific table to specific class object. (NOTE: Almost any recent ORM can avoid you from this layer. For example http://dbphp.net or Doctrine will support every aspect of this layer plus relations and even auto table generation).

  3. Business layer - This layer contains your actual working classes business layer often stands for model or model includes business layer. But in real world if you are using ORM library business the only layer you need to develop other functions are already bundled in ORM.

Let us begin our example from Business layer or model. Our very very simple project which saves and loads users will have one class business layer:

<?php
class user
{
    public $id;
    public $name
    public function __construct ($name=null)
    {
        $this->name = $name;
    }
}
?>

As you see your business layer or model knows nothing about where and how it is saved or loaded. It just does only handle project related business. That's the point the layer name comes from.

Second, let us make a simple ORM library:

<?php

//The connection link which can be changed any time
class link
{
    public $link;
    public function __construct ($hostname, $database, $username, $password)
    {
        $this->link = new \PDO ('mysql:host='.$hostname.';dbname='.$database, $username, $password);
        $this->link->query('use '.$database);
    }
    public function fetch ($query)
    {
        $result = $this->link->query($query)->fetch();
    }
    public function query ($query)
    {
        return $this->link->query($query);
    }
    public function error ()
    {
        return $this->link->errorInfo();
    }
}

//A structure which collects all link(s) and table/class handlers togather
class database
{
    public $link;
    public $tables = array ();
    public function __construct ($link)
    {
        $this->link = $link;
        table::$database = $this;
    }
}

//A basic table handler class
//Note: Every modern ORM automatically maps your classes to tables
class table
{
    public static $database;
}
?>

As you noticed our table class in our ORM seems very poor. But if this was a complex ORM library it would support also data layer and had all functionality to work with any table.

But because we need to know how ORMs do work in this case we will make data layer handlers for every class in our business layer.

So this is your data layer. It is so self descriptive that I think it does not need any documentation:

Note that following class name is users and not user. 'user' class object represents a single entity of user while 'users' class object represents handler for user class.

<?php
class users extends table
{
    public function create ($row)
    {
        $return = new user ();
        $return->id = $row[0];
        $return->name = $row[1];
        var_export($row);
        return $return;
    }
    public function load ($id=null)
    {
        if ($id==null)
        {
            $result = self::$database->link->fetch("select * from users");
            if ($result)
            {
                $return = array();
                foreach ($result as $row)
                {
                    $return[$row[0]] = $this->create($row);
                }
                return $return;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            $result = self::$database->link->fetch("select * from users where id='".$id."'");
            if ($result)
            {
                return $this->create(reset($result));
            }
            else
            {
                echo ("no result");
            }
        }
    }
    public function save ($user)
    {
        if (is_array($save))
        {
            foreach ($save as $item) $this->save ($item);
        }
        if ($user->id==null)
        {
            return self::$database->link->query("insert into users set
                                                 name='".$user->name."'");
        }
        else
        {
            return self::$database->link->query("update users set name='".$user->name."'
                                                 where id='".$user->id."'");
        }
    }
    public function delete ($user)
    {
        self::$database->link->query ("delete from users where id='".$user->id."'");
    }
}
?>
  1. At last let us init $database object
  2. Establish some to some sql server link.
  3. Add user class handler to database.
  4. Use it.

Here is it in work:

<?
$database = new database (new link('127.0.0.1', 'system_db', 'root', '1234'));
$database->tables['users'] = new users();

if (!$database->tables['users']->save (new user('Admin')))
{
    var_export($database->link->error());
}

var_export($database->tables['users']->load(2));
?>

If you need to dive in other concepts of php ORM's feel free to visit

  1. Doctrine - http://www.doctrine-project.org/ - Full functional complex php ORM framework
  2. db.php - http://dbphp.net/ - Full functional but very easy php ORM framework.

See? ORMs does not eat developers : P

If your looking for easy start - begin with http://github.com/hazardland/db.php

share|improve this answer

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