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I'm surprised at how it is possible to continue execution even after a StackOverflowError has occurred in Java.

I know that StackOverflowError is a sublass of the class Error. The class Error is decumented as "a subclass of Throwable that indicates serious problems that a reasonable application should not try to catch."

This sounds more like a recommendation than a rule, subtending that catching a Error like a StackOverflowError is in fact permitted and it's up to the programmer's reasonability not to do so. And see, I tested this code and it terminates normally.

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        try {
            foo();
        } catch (StackOverflowError e) {
            bar();
        }
        System.out.println("normal termination");
    }

    private static void foo() {
        System.out.println("foo");
        foo();
    }

    private static void bar() {
        System.out.println("bar");
    }
}

How can this be? I think by the time the StackOverflowError is thrown, the stack should be so full that there is no room for calling another function. Is the error handling block running in a different stack, or what is going on here?

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4  
48  
I make errors on StackOverflow all the time. Doesn't stop me from coming back though. –  Lego Stormtroopr Mar 3 at 2:45
9  
Yo dawg... I heard you liked stack overflows so we put a stack overflow in your stackoverflow.com ! –  Pierre Henry Mar 3 at 9:17
    
Because modern architectures use Frame Pointers to facilitate unwinding stacks, even partial ones. As long as the code+context to do that don't have to be allocated dynamically off the stack, there shouldn't be a problem. –  RBarryYoung Mar 3 at 16:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 105 down vote accepted

When the stack overflows and StackOverflowError is thrown, the usual exception handling unwinds the stack. Unwinding the stack means:

  • abort the execution of the currently active function
  • delete its stack frame, proceed with the calling function
  • abort the execution of the caller
  • delete its stack frame, proceed with the calling function
  • and so on...

... until the exception is caught. This is normal (in fact, necessary) and independent of which exception is thrown and why. Since you catch the exception outside of the first call to foo(), the thousands of foo stack frames that filled the stack have all been unwound and most of the stack is free to be used again.

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@fge Feel free to edit, I considered a paragraph break but couldn't find a place where it looked good. –  delnan Mar 2 at 14:21
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You could use bullet points... I am reluctant to editing post of other people ;) –  fge Mar 2 at 14:22
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The point is that the innermost foo terminated with undefined state, so any object it may have touched must be assumed to be broken. As you do not know which function the stack overflow occured in, only that it must be a descendant of the try block that caught it, any object that may be modified by any method reachable from there is now suspect. Usually it is not worthwhile to find out what happened and try to fix it. –  Simon Richter Mar 2 at 18:42
1  
@delnan, I think the answer is incomplete without also going into detail why this is a bad idea. The difference to an explicitly thrown exception is that Errors cannot be anticipated even when writing exception safe code. –  Simon Richter Mar 2 at 18:53
1  
@SimonRichter: Even if one presumes that any object which was altered by code which threw an unexpected exception is likely corrupt, there are many methods which won't touch anything except a new object under construction. Consequently, if code can deal with the inability to construct the new object, there won't be any other problem. That having been said, I wish there was a nice way via which methods could ask the system to throw a LowstackException before entering a try/finally block whose finally block might not complete. –  supercat Mar 3 at 2:31

When the StackOverflowError is thrown, the stack is full. However, when it's caught, all those foo calls have been popped from the stack. bar can run normally because the stack is no longer overflowing with foos. (Note that I don't think the JLS guarantees you can recover from a stack overflow like this.)

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When the StackOverFlow occurs, the JVM will pop down to the catch, freeing the stack.

In you example, it get rids of all the stacked foo.

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Because the stack doesn't actually overflow. A better name might be AttemptToOverflowStack. Basically what it means is that the last attempt to adjust the stack frame errs because there isn't enough free space left on the stack. The stack could actually have lots of space left, just not enough space. So, whatever operation would have depended upon the call succeeding (typically a method invocation), never gets exectued and all that is left is for the program to deal with that fact. Which means that it is really no different from any other exception. In fact, you could catch the exception in the function that is making the call.

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Just be careful if you do this that your exception handler doesn't require more stack space than is available! –  Vince Mar 3 at 14:16

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