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I inherited a Windows C/C++ code TCP/IP server to maintain, where a previous programmer defined an extra port to use for basic HTTP comms. The server uses the Windows socket lib 2, handling requests by spawning new threads to send from. The problem seems to be that an HTTP request for an HTML page with multiple items seems to fail to fully load the page, meaning that the client gets an endless spinning icon in the web browser.

Messing with the code I found that the problem is that the client (e.g. Chrome v33) is firing off multiple GET requests on the same port, meaning that the server is therefore starting new threads to handle these requests on the same socket. That is, the socket returned by accept() (i.e. the connection socket, not the listening socket) is then passed on to the CreateThread() user function to process the GET request. However, the first thread to start closes this socket when it is finished sending, meaning other threads find the socket has been closed when it comes to their turn to send. I experimented with not closing the socket and this worked better and loaded more of the page, but still didn't fully finish the page load, presumably since none of the server threads closed the socket to let the client know the webpage is complete.

So my question is, how is this situation meant to be handled by a multithreaded HTTP server? Is it strictly taboo or ill advised to have multiple threads communicating on the same socket? It seems to make sense that modern web browsers would make multiple concurrent (rather than sequential) requests for page items, but then it would also seem to make sense for efficiency for a server to also handle these requests in separate threads rather than sequentially in one thread. Must each request somehow open its own socket - perhaps by calling accept() within the new thread?

Is this usually solved via a timeout to close the socket, or via an alive timer or similar? Or is it better to use HTTP v1.0 to disable persistent connections? Or is there perhaps another way of knowing when all webpage elements have been sent and closing the server socket then? Here's the socket closing code, in case there is some other winsock2 option I missed that magically handles persistent connections:

bool ShutdownConnection
(
CONFIG      *configSP,
SOCKET sd
)
{
    if ( shutdown(sd, SD_SEND) == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        return false;
    }
    char readBuf[bufSize];

    while (1)
    {
        int newBytes = recv(sd, readBuf, bufSize, 0);

        if (newBytes == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    if (closesocket(sd) == SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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1  
You should be closing the socket returned from accept, are you sure you're not closing the (original) listening socket? We miss some context for that. –  Daniel Sloof Mar 2 '14 at 14:19
    
There seem to be a subject of confusion here. A socket is a communication end-point, meaning that for each connection made by the client to the server, there is a distinct socket that must be accepted by the server. It seems like you might be having an issue with HTTP/1.1 persistent connections, which means that several requests are sent on the same connection. This is controlled by the use of the Connection HTTP header. –  SirDarius Mar 2 '14 at 14:21
    
Are you closing the socket that listens, or the one that has accepted? –  uʍop ǝpısdn Mar 2 '14 at 14:23
1  
What is the while (1) for? –  alk Mar 2 '14 at 14:24
    
Sorry folks, should clarify that I have a listening socket created and a port I bind() to, but I never close the listening socket. The socket I am talking about and close (or don't) is the one returned from accept(). –  Piers Mar 2 '14 at 14:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Haven't solved this completely, but the easiest workaround was to switch back to a single-thread for HTTP comm's and close the socket after each message.

I didn't find much info about this on the web, but FAQ 3.10 on the Winsock Programmer's Guide suggests that using send() on the same socket in multiple threads is a bad idea due to the possibility of interleaved send data.

So if anyone is interested in actually implementing a multithreaded HTTP v1.1 server, I guess they will need to implement a message queue and a dedicated thread for doing sequential send() calls on the same socket and use "Connection: keep-alive". I guess if you do this then you could close the socket after the last message and a timeout period, and send "Connection: close" in the last HTTP header, but it may be better to just leave the socket open for revival at any time.

Implementing a message queue with multiple threads will probably be more efficient than my single-threaded solution, however for my low-bandwidth needs this extra code complexity isn't worth it.

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