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I am trying to write some simple code to verify how many digits each number from an array has but I got stuck with some strange behavior.

The first 3 numbers from the array are either evaluated in the while loop as false, which would mean (120/1)%10 is equal to 0, which shouldn't be true or something else is wrong here.

Do you have any ideas? The algorithm works as expected after the 3rd number from array.

Thanks for suggestions in advance.

int main(){

    int nums[SIZE] = {120,210,3,4375,54443};
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i){

        printf("Var i inside FOR: \t%d\n", i);
        printf("Var nums i inside FOR: \t%d\n", nums[i]);
        int wtest = 1;
        printf("Var wtest inside FOR: \t\t%d\n\n", wtest);

        while (((nums[i] / wtest)%10) != 0){
              wtest = wtest * 10;
              printf("Var wtest iside while: \t\t\t%d\n\n", wtest);                  
        }
    }  

    getchar();            
    return 0;

}

Output:

Var i inside FOR:   0
Var nums i inside FOR:  120
Var wtest inside FOR:       1

Var i inside FOR:   1
Var nums i inside FOR:  210
Var wtest inside FOR:       1

Var i inside FOR:   2
Var nums i inside FOR:  3
Var wtest inside FOR:       1

Var wtest iside while:          10

Var i inside FOR:   3
Var nums i inside FOR:  4375
Var wtest inside FOR:       1

Var wtest iside while:          10

Var wtest iside while:          100

Var wtest iside while:          1000

Var wtest iside while:          10000

Var i inside FOR:   4
Var nums i inside FOR:  54443
Var wtest inside FOR:       1

Var wtest iside while:          10

Var wtest iside while:          100

Var wtest iside while:          1000

Var wtest iside while:          10000

Var wtest iside while:          100000
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Why should (120 / 1) % 10) == 0 not be true in your opinion? –  M Oehm Mar 2 at 15:44
    
What seems to be the problem with (120/1 )%10? –  Eutherpy Mar 2 at 15:45
1  
This looks correct to me, 120 / 10 = 12 therefore 120 % 10 = 0 –  DairyLea Mar 2 at 15:46
    
See what % operator does: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_arithmetic –  Etherealone Mar 2 at 16:08
    
Yep - you are right guys. I was pretty wrong and overextended. Thanks for your comments. I really appreciate it. –  damian1baran Jun 15 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code logic is wrong. By testing the remainder of a division by 10, you actually check whetner the digit at the corresponding place is a zero - which is the case for the last digits of 120 and 210. And the last digit is the one you check first.

You should only check whether the result of the division i zero:

int wtest = 1;

while (nums[i] / wtest != 0) {
      wtest = wtest * 10;
}

The division only yields zero if nums[i] is less than wtest, so you can rewrite this to:

int wtest = 1;

while (nums[i] > wtest) {
      wtest = wtest * 10;
}

This will of course not give you the digit count but the smallest power of ten that is greater than your number.

share|improve this answer

int main(){

int nums[SIZE] = {120,210,3,4375,54443};
int i;

for (i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i){

    printf("Var i inside FOR: \t%d\n", i);
    printf("Var nums i inside FOR: \t%d\n", nums[i]);
    int j = 0;
    int n = nums[i];
   do
      {
        n=n/10;
           j++;
      }while(n!=0);                
    }
}  

getchar();            
return 0;

}

Here the do-while loop will count the number of digits in the number , the number 0 will be counted as 1 the reason to use do while instead of just while. Hope this helps you.

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