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It's been a few days that I've been looking for a clean solution to this, but I am beginning to think it's not intended to be done by design, so I'm asking your opinion on the following.

I'll try to be short: I am using LINQ to SQL in C# to manipulate a table on a SQL server trough custom stored procedures as insert and update methods.

Since I am still a beginner with C#, i used the O-R Designer to create the DataContext class for me. Inside my code, i initialize a DataContext, retrieve data, perform necessary operations on it, and call the submitChanges() method to persist it to the database.

Everything goes fine, until an update or insert operation conflicts with a table constraint (e.g. I try to insert a duplicate value into a column with an UNIQUE constraint), resulting into an unhandled exception.

Unfortunately, the exception is not thrown by the submitChanges() method, which is the only one over which I have easy control (i.e. I can easily wrap it with try/catch and perform error handling staying in the same scope), it is instead thrown by the stored procedure call which is placed in a method inside the DataContext class from which i cannot access the resources I would like to use to handle the exception (e.g. the user interface)

From my previous readings, I assume the most popular scenario is preventing the exception to be thrown by implementing client-side validation, making the exception a rare and critical event which should not be recovered.

What i want to do instead is to delegate data validation to the SQL server, and in case of invalid data, handle the exception on the client side. (displaying an error)

Most programmers think for different reasons that this is a wrong aproach, but I'd like to know if it is possible in the first place. Can i handle the exception in a more practical way? Is there something I'm missing?

EDIT: To clarify better the problem, the exception is thrown in the following method

[global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.FunctionAttribute(Name="Contabilità.Cliente_modifica")]
        public int Cliente_modifica([global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ParameterAttribute(DbType="Int")] System.Nullable<int> id, [global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ParameterAttribute(DbType="VarChar(50)")] string nuovoNome)
        {
            IExecuteResult result = this.ExecuteMethodCall(this, ((MethodInfo)(MethodInfo.GetCurrentMethod())), id, nuovoNome);
            return ((int)(result.ReturnValue));
        }

I Could wrap the call to the stored procedure in a try-catch statement as follows:

[global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.FunctionAttribute(Name="Contabilità.Cliente_modifica")]
        public int Cliente_modifica([global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ParameterAttribute(DbType="Int")] System.Nullable<int> id, [global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ParameterAttribute(DbType="VarChar(50)")] string nuovoNome)
        {
            IExecuteResult result = null;
            try
            {
                result = this.ExecuteMethodCall(this, ((MethodInfo)(MethodInfo.GetCurrentMethod())), id, nuovoNome);
            }
            catch (Exception exc)
            {

            }
            return ((int)(result.ReturnValue));
        }

Which does work, but throws in turn another null pointer exception because the value of result doesn't get modified. In addition to this, from this scope i cannot access the graphic interface (which is instead accessible from the block where i call submitChanges() )

How do I handle (even if in an uncomfortable way) the exception in that method? Is there a way to handle it somwhere else?

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2 Answers 2

If you call your stored procedure inside a method, use a try/catch block.

In it throws some exception, it will jump to the catch and you will be able to do handle the exception, I don´t know, maybe throwing a message with the error, logging the error in a database or something ;)

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Hi Oscar, I have thought about that, but unfortunately the method in which the stored procedure is called isn't very friendly for exception handling purposes. Plus, I have no control over any method that is calling him, so I cannot intercept it on a higher level of the stack. I will add some details to my question so that I can explain myself better. –  Pharanoise Mar 2 at 17:06
    
I think that you need to find the way to make the method friendly ahaha I don´t know, add a support method to call the method in which the store procedure is called, and then add there the try/catch or something. I think that you can add something in the business layer to handle it –  Oscar Bralo Mar 2 at 17:09
    
I have added some details to my question, please read them and tell me if it is somehow more clear now what is the nature of the problem. In the meantime, thanks for trying to help! –  Pharanoise Mar 2 at 17:14
    
I think that you could change your int to int?. This way you will be able to return a null, then in the place where you call this method, check if return is null, if it´s, then means that nothing has been updated, otherwise, will be correct. Then, in the same place from you call this method, use th try/catch block there, and even you can do something like, if result == null, throw new ArgumentNullException or something like that. I hope this helps –  Oscar Bralo Mar 2 at 17:20

Can you show the stored procedure? You may be able to do the insert/update logic within your LINQ to SQL code and simply call SubmitChanges() there, rather than handing it off to the stored procedure. This will provide immediate feedback regarding validation and success of the insert/update, which can then be passed back to the UI. I find this to be a much better method of inserting/updating unless I have a great deal of DB logic that really requires a stored procedure. You will want to make sure your input is parameterized to protect against SQL injection.

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