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Using WMI's ManagementEventWatcher/EventArrivedEventHandler will result in creating another thread which I'm trying to avoid. WMI also is knowing for its delay.
So my question is : how can I detect Windows process creation/termination with C# without WMI ? is there a way to do this from unmanaged code ?

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@DavidHeffernan here's my question. –  JohnTube Mar 2 '14 at 18:13
    
You might want to re-evaluate you software design if unusual requirements like that arise. –  sam Mar 20 '14 at 20:01
    
Are you looking to do this for all processes starting/exiting on a machine, or for one process specifically? –  aevitas Mar 24 '14 at 15:37
    
All processes yes...precisely (futile) : all processes of one user (all processes in a Windows session except those running under "SYSTEM" account) –  JohnTube Mar 24 '14 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

To the best of my knowledge, the only supported way to subscribe to process create/destroy events is through WMI. I think you are rejecting the option of polling, in which case it is either WMI, or bust.

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should I ask another question to solve my original problem : how to "create and communicate" with a thread responsible for calling SetWinEventHook, having a message pump/loop and receiving callbacks, in c# ? –  JohnTube Mar 2 '14 at 20:57
    
I'm sorry, I don't really understand that, and I can't see how it is related to this question. If you want to ask a different question, why did you ask this one? I don't really understand. –  David Heffernan Mar 2 '14 at 20:59
    
this was my original question remember, my problem is related to this "For out-of-context events, the event is delivered on the same thread that called SetWinEventHook." –  JohnTube Mar 2 '14 at 21:01
    
maybe I can call GetProcessTimes() just after a process exits (Process.WaitForExit()) ? –  JohnTube Apr 21 '14 at 19:26

You can use Event Tracing for Windows (ETW). Specifically, you want to look at subclasses of the Process class in the kernel event tracer.

I haven't ever used this from managed code, but this blog post looks useful.

And I don't know if this creates extra threads in your process.

In summary, you don't need WMI to monitor process events. You can use ETW instead but I don't know if it exactly meets your requirements.

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Thank you for your answer but I don't need extra configuration, I want to do this using code only. I know it's my fault that this isn't explicitly mentioned in the question. –  JohnTube Mar 27 '14 at 9:55

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