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I'm creating a component with many published properties for the IDE, and one of such properties is an enum set with 38 values...

type
  TBigEnum = (beOne, beTwo, beThree, beFour, beFive, beSix, beSeven, beEight,
    beNine, beTen, beEleven, beTwelve, beThirteen, beFourteen, beFifteen,
    beSixteen, beSeventeen, beEighteen, beNineteen, beTwenty, beTwentyOne,
    beTwentyTwo, beTwentyThree, beTwentyFour, beTwentyFive, beTwentySix,
    beTwentySeven, beTwentyEight, beTwentyNine, beThirty, beThirtyOne,
    beThirtyTwo, beThirtyThree, beThirtyFour, beThirtyFive, beThirtySix,
    beThirtySeven, beThirtyEight);
  TBigEnums = set of TBigEnum;

Now, I try to use this in a component as a published property...

type
  TMyComponent = class(TComponent)
  private
    FBigEnums: TBigEnums;
  published
    property BigEnums: TBigEnums read FBigEnums write FBigEnums;
  end;

But the compiler does not let me...

[DCC Error] MyUnit.pas(50): E2187 Size of published set 'BigEnums' is >4 bytes

I understand this limitation, but how can I get around this without splitting it into two different sets?

PS - Each of these values actually has a unique name and purpose, but for the sake of example I just used the number as their names.

share|improve this question
2  
This enum set actually represents all the possible flags in an Inno Setup script [Files] section. There are 38 possible flags, so I put 38 enum values. – Jerry Dodge Mar 2 '14 at 20:50

I don't remember the exactly correct syntax but in principle:

1 If the "property" does not have to be easily editable in the property inspector then definining 38 different consts of type Long with their values set to 1 shl 0, 1 shl 1, 1 shl 2..

so that those consts can be combined like this PropOne or PropTwo or PropThree

2 if the property must be editable in the property inspector then the TMyPersistent class proposed in Jerry's answer seems ok to me

3 there might be a way built-into the language (or compiler directive) how to type-cast the set representation so that it uses 8 bytes for storage. Int32 and Int64 are both native data types well supported on new processors and both assembler, C++ and C# can deal with it. Some Pascal flavor (Free Pascal?) either has it implemented or it was in the road map

EDIT option 3 seems to be misleading. What can Free Pascal compiler do regarding enums is listed here http://www.freepascal.org/docs-html/prog/prog.html, especially in chapter $PACKENUM. As of today enums are always backed by 32bit ordinals. So the possibility to increase number of bits used for "enums" possible in assembler, C++, C# is not likely to be available in Delphi.

I'm not even sure if bitwise operators and, or, not, shl, shr used in other languages to implement enums and sets are available for 8-byte integers either in Delphi or in Free Pascal so the option 1 might also be misleading and the winner is option 2

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for reminding me to accept my answer to my own question. I'll accept your answer if you can demonstrate proposal #3. – Jerry Dodge Apr 20 '14 at 23:57
up vote -2 down vote accepted

I'm asking and answering this Q/A style...

Create a persistent property instead, listing a boolean indexed property for each of the 38 values. The end effect is nearly the same as in the IDE, in exception of things like the in statement, and you lose all the advantages of a set...

type
  TBooleanArray = array of Boolean;

  TMyPersistent = class(TPersistent)
  private
    FValues: TBooleanArray;
    function GetValue(const Index: Integer): Boolean;
    procedure SetValue(const Index: Integer; const Value: Boolean);
  public
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy; override;
    function AnySelected: Boolean;
  published
    property PropOne: Boolean index 0 read GetValue write SetValue;
    property PropTwo: Boolean index 1 read GetValue write SetValue;
    property PropThree: Boolean index 2 read GetValue write SetValue;
    ....
    property PropThirtyEight: Boolean index 37 read GetValue write SetValue;
  end;

  TMyComponent = class(TComponent)
  private
    FMyPersistent: TMyPersistent;
    procedure SetMyPersistent(Value: TMyPersistent);
  public
    constructor Create(AOwner: TComponent); override;
    destructor Destroy; override;
  published
    property MyPersistent: TMyPersistent read FMyPersistent write SetMyPersistent;
  end;

implementation

constructor TMyPersistent.Create;
begin
  SetLength(FValues, 38);
end;

destructor TMyPersistent.Destroy;
begin
  SetLength(FValues, 0);
  inherited;
end;

function TMyPersistent.GetValue(const Index: Integer): Boolean;
begin
  Result:= FValues[Index];
end;

procedure TMyPersistent.SetValue(const Index: Integer; const Value: Boolean);
begin
  FValues[Index]:= Value;
end;

function TMyPersistent.AnySelected: Boolean;
var
  X: Integer;
begin
  Result:= False;
  for X := 0 to Length(FValues)-1 do begin
    Result:= FValues[X];
    if Result then Break;
  end;
end;

constructor TMyComponent.Create(AOwner: TComponent);
begin
  inherited;
  FMyPersistent:= TMyPersistent.Create;
end;

destructor TMyComponent.Destroy;
begin
  FMyPersistent.Free;
end;

procedure TMyComponent.SetMyPersistent(Value: TMyPersistent);
begin
  FMyPersistent.Assign(Value);
end;
share|improve this answer
2  
I would absolutely not do it that way. 38 individual properties! Yuch! – David Heffernan Mar 2 '14 at 20:38
    
@David indeed, that's why I put the actual values in an array. But can you think of a better way? Only other alternative is splitting the set into two different ones, but in my scenario there's not much categorization that can be done. – Jerry Dodge Mar 2 '14 at 20:38
    
But now you have lost the benefits of the set. I'm sure there's a better way. – David Heffernan Mar 2 '14 at 20:40
3  
And for heavens sake, don't declare 38 properties. Just expose a single indexed property. – David Heffernan Mar 2 '14 at 20:44
2  
Which is why you write a property editor for that property then? Because the TSetProperty editor cannot handle set properties bigger than 4 byte if you look into the code (which is probably why the compiler prevents it). – Stefan Glienke Mar 2 '14 at 23:39

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