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We recently received a report that our application will occasionally fail to run. I tracked down the problem code to this:

struct ARRAY2D
{
   long[] col;
}

int numRows = 800000;
int numCols = 300;
array = (ARRAY2D*) malloc(numRows * numCols * sizeof(long))

This allocation of 800 Mb can fail if the user doesn't have a large enough free block. What is the best way to change how I allocate the memory?

Keep in mind that I have a large amount of code that accesses this object like this: array[row].col[colNum], so I need something that requires minor or primarily find & replace editing of the array access code.

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2  
Are you using C or C++? Your tags aren't helping. – Peter Alexander Feb 6 '10 at 14:18
    
@Poita: he's probably using C++ but only the C features. shrug – Andreas Bonini Feb 6 '10 at 14:20
    
Is it always the case that your app needs to allocate this memory or is it dependant on a particular scenario in the app? – zebrabox Feb 6 '10 at 14:20
    
I always have to allocate this much memory. – Brian Feb 6 '10 at 14:47
    
Does C++ let you declare arrays like long[] a instead of long a[]? I have seen that type of syntax in questions tagged C or C++ way too many times. Or are people just not copying and pasting their code? – Alok Singhal Feb 6 '10 at 18:02
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can allocate smaller chunks of memory separately, instead of one huge block.

long** array = NULL;  
array = (long**) malloc(numCols * sizeof(long*));  
for (int i = 0; i < numCols; i++)  
   array[i] = (long*)  malloc(numRows * sizeof(long));

Generally, memory allocation may fail, every allocation. However, let's say statistically, due to memory fragmentation, allocating a single large block of memory has higher chance to fail more often than allocating N number of smaller blocks. Although, also the solution above may cause problems as it is a bit like a double-bladed sword because it may lead to further memory fragmentation.

In other words, there is no generally perfect answer and solution depends on details of a system and application.

As from the comments it seems C++ library is a possibility, then solution based on std::vector (i.e. generic vector of vectors in C++) or using Boost.MultiArray

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I'm not sure I understand your code snippet. The allocation can still fail, right? – batbrat Feb 6 '10 at 15:12
    
@barbrat I updated my answer to address your question – mloskot Feb 6 '10 at 15:48

Will there be a lot of default values in your ARRAY2D? If yes, you need a sparse array. The minimal change would be to use an unordered_map (or hash_map or map):

static const int numRows = 800000;
static const int numCols = 300;

struct ARRAY2D {
  long col[numCols];
  // initialize a column to zero; not necessary.
  ARRAY2D() { memset(col, 0, sizeof(col)); }
};


// no need to malloc
std::unordered_map<int, ARRAY2D> array;
...
// accessing is same as before ...
array[1204].col[212] = 4423;
printf("%d", array[1204].col[115]);
...
// no need to free.

If the row indices are always continuous but much less than numRows, use a std::vector instead.

std::vector<ARRAY2D> array;
...
// resize to the approach value.
array.resize(2000);
...
// accessing is same as before ...
array[1204].col[212] = 4423;
printf("%d", array[1204].col[115]);
...
// no need to free.
share|improve this answer
    
There will be default values in certain parts of the array. Sometimes there were be less rows than numRows and less columns than numCols. – Brian Feb 6 '10 at 14:20
    
OP has tagged with C and C++, so I'd assume he is looking for solution usable in C as well – mloskot Feb 6 '10 at 14:21
1  
Then why did he tag it C++? – Andreas Bonini Feb 6 '10 at 14:21
    
@Brian: Having less rows and columns than the maximum is fine because an unordered map will use more memory only when the number of entries increases. – kennytm Feb 6 '10 at 14:22
1  
If STL is the best choice, then I can use it. – Brian Feb 6 '10 at 14:30

I wrote a simple example, how i would allocate the array in large chunks:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct ARRAY2D {
  long *col;
  char free;
};

struct ARRAY2D *ARRAY2D_malloc( int numRows, int numCols ){
  struct ARRAY2D *rows = malloc( numRows * sizeof(struct ARRAY2D) );
  if( rows ){
    for( int i=0,b=numRows; i<numRows; i+=b ){
      char *mem;
      while( b && !(mem = malloc(b*numCols*sizeof(rows[0].col[0]))) ) b--;
      if( b<1 ){
        while( --i >= 0 ) if(rows[i].free) free(rows[i].col);
        free(rows); rows=NULL; break;
      }
      for( int j=i; j<i+b && j<numRows; j++ ){
        rows[j].free=(j==i);
        rows[j].col = (void*)mem; mem += numCols*sizeof(rows[0].col[0]);
      }
    }
  }
  return rows;
}

int main(void){
  int numRows = 8000000;
  int numCols = 300;
  struct ARRAY2D *array = ARRAY2D_malloc( numRows, numCols );
  if( array ){
    printf( "array[numRows-1].col[numCols-1]=%li\n", array[numRows-1].col[numCols-1]=3 );
  }
  else{
    puts("not enough memory");
  }
}

b is the number of rows allocated in one step. Decrementing b with one is a simple strategy when there are no large blocks of free memory.

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Your code has syntax errors: you are missing a semicolon and long[] col; is invalid C or C++.

Given:

struct ARRAY2D
{
   long *col;
};
ARRAY2D *array;
int numRows = 800000;
int numCols = 300;
array = (ARRAY2D*) malloc(numRows * numCols * sizeof(long));

you are potentially allocating the wrong amount of memory: sizeof(long) should be replaced by sizeof *array, or sizeof(ARRAY2D).

Assuming you got the right amount, you can index your array as: array[i], for i in the range [0, numRows*numCols). You haven't allocated any memory for col members of any of the array[i], so you can't index into col of any of those. Your use of array[row].col[colNum] is therefore wrong given the allocation scheme you have posted.

Perhaps it would help if you posted some real code that works.

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