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Hello I am trying to develop a function to find duplicates in a list. Below is the code that I have obtained thus far. I am cannot seem to figure out how to get the code to correctly add the number of duplicated numbers.

import collections

myList = [5, 9, 14, 5, 2, 5, 1]

def find_duplicates(aList, target):
    if target not in aList:
        print (target, "occurred 0 times")
    else:
        n=0
        print (target, "occurred",n+1,"times")  

the output of the code shows:

find_duplicates(myList, 5)
5 occurred 1 times

Obviously I am missing something for the program to properly track how many times the value occurs? Can someone please help?

I am not allowed to use the count() or sort() built in functions.

share|improve this question

To only count the number of duplicates, just iterate over the list, comparing each value. If you find a match, increment a counter, than report the counter. To make this better, I would return the count then print to console outside of the def.

import collections

def find_duplicates(aList, target):
    n = 0
    for obj in aList:
        if obj is target:
            n += 1
    return n



myList = [5, 9, 14, 5, 2, 5, 1]
target = 5
num_dup = find_duplicates(myList, target)
print (target, "occurred", num_dup, "times")

This should echo out:

5 occurred 3 times

Or do this (with list.count(x)):

myList = [5, 9, 14, 5, 2, 5, 1]
target = 5
num_dup = myList.count(target)
print (target, "occurred", num_dup, "times")

This should echo out:

5 occurred 3 times
share|improve this answer

You forgot to increment n in your code, so it always print 1. I think your code should look like:

import collections

myList = [5, 9, 14, 5, 2, 5, 1]

def find_duplicates(aList, target):
    if target not in aList:
        print (target, "occurred 0 times")
    else:
        n= aList.count(5)
        print (target, "occurred",n,"times")  

without using count and reading the target from shell:

import collections

myList = [5, 9, 14, 5, 2, 5, 2]

def find_duplicates(aList, target):
    result = 0
    for item in aList:
        if item == target:
            result += 1    
    return result

try:
    target = int(raw_input("Choose a number to find duplicates: ")) # for python 3.X use input instead of raw_input
    res = find_duplicates(myList, target)
    print (target, " occurred ", res, " times")
except:
    print("Write a number, not anything else")

This works for integers, if you want to use floats, just change int(...) for float(...)

share|improve this answer
    
I am not allowed to use the count() or sort() built in functions. – user3321010 Mar 2 '14 at 23:43
    
But are you looking only for how many times target appears or to find all duplicates numbers in your list? – Ruben Bermudez Mar 2 '14 at 23:46
    
I am looking to find how many times a duplicates occurs in my list. For example if we enter 14 I would want the program to scan the list and return 1. This is the same case for 5 but I cant seem to get it to say 3 it is only returning 1. – user3321010 Mar 2 '14 at 23:50
    
I updated my answer with an alternative way – Ruben Bermudez Mar 2 '14 at 23:54
    
Is there a specific reason you set the target to 5? The output I get when I run the program in the python shell is correct but when I run the find_duplicates(myList, 5) in the shell it just spits out 5. I need the program to do the following: when I type in find_duplicates(myList, 2) to return 2 occurred 2 times. – user3321010 Mar 3 '14 at 0:11

it's a simple case of using a dictionary. Check the following code:

def frequency(l):
    counter = {}
    for x in l:
        counter[x] = counter.get(x, 0) + 1

    return counter

It will iterate over the list, saving each element as a key to the counter dictionary. Note the special form counter.get(x, 0), it will return the value of counter[x] if x is already on the dict, else it will return zero.

Checking the results is a matter of using:

print(frequency(myList))
>>> {9: 1, 2: 1, 5: 3, 14: 1, 1: 1}

You can get the number of appearances of any member by inspecting the dictionary:

frq = frequency(myList)
print(frq[14])
>>> 1

print(frq[1])
>>> 1

Of course it's possible to write a wrapper:

def target_frequencty(target, my_list):
    frq = frequencty(my_list)
    return frq.get(target, 0)

Enjoy.

share|improve this answer

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