Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a Java newbie and stuck with this:

BufferedReader br1 = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

and

InputStreamReader ISR = new InputStreamReader(System.in);     
BufferedReader BR = new BufferedReader(ISR);
  • What is the difference between them?

  • Also, is it compulsory to throw IOException when i'm getting inputs from user?

thanks.

share|improve this question
add comment

9 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The only difference is that the second form explicitly saves the reference to the InputStreamReader to a variable, which may or may not be useful depending on if you do something with it afterwards.

share|improve this answer
add comment

No difference, just a matter of preference.

Those methods throw checked exceptions, so you're obliged to either handle them if you can or throw to the calling method.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed. The only slight difference is having another reference to the InputStreamReader via ISR. It might be good to use the first one so he doesn't accidentally use ISR later and possibly screw up BRs state. –  NG. Feb 6 '10 at 15:24
    
Agreed, but hopefully it's being done in the scope of a local method, so the temporary won't be hanging around for very long. –  duffymo Feb 6 '10 at 15:28
add comment

The difference is that the second one is more verbose and uses a temporary variable for the InputStreamReader. You get the first version by substituting ISR with new InputStreamReader(System.in).

But both do the same thing. Advantage of the the later one is that you can still access the InputStreamReader later in your code through the variable ISR (if you have/want to).

share|improve this answer
add comment

- Answer to 1st question There is absolutely no difference except that you will create a reference to InputStreamReader also which again you can avoid....I personally prefer avoiding it

- Answer to 2nd question

I/O Exceptions are checked exceptions i.e exceptions are checked at compile time while we have unchecked exceptions also in Java which are checked at run time

For more on checked and unchecked exceptions you can refer here

share|improve this answer
add comment

There's no real difference between the two other than the fact that the first does not allow you to distinguish between exceptions from the instantiation of the two objects without careful inspection of the exception.

share|improve this answer
add comment
  1. Actually second variant allows you to use ISR directly, in this case it can cause some problems. But second variant also allows you to close ISR if closing BR fails.
  2. No, it is not compulsory. It is better to show him human readable message.
share|improve this answer
add comment

They will result in the same thing. a BufferedReader based on System.in in BR and br1.

If you need the ISR later on for some other reason then you would go with that version first. Just a matter of preference really, shorthand vs verbose.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Well, The question has been answered comprehensively. Yet, I would like to stress to use the first syntax since you can avoid the extra reference allocated. Moreover, allocating the extra reference has the potential of making the garbage collector in delaying its job. It does not necessarily mean that it would not garbage collect, but still it poses a slight overhead.

So, the answer would be try to use the first syntax at all times except that you need to do some manipulations with ISR variable later.

Cheers,

Braga

share|improve this answer
add comment

No difference, just first form is more compact and efficient if you might say because no extra reference for InputStreamReader is created.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.