Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to trigger a function whenever window.location.href changes but I'm running into problems. I went over the source for various watch polyfills, but I can't quite follow what was going on with the code.

if (!Object.prototype.watch) {
  Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "watch", {
    enumerable: false
    , configurable: true
    , writable: false
    , value: function (prop, handler) {
      var
        oldval = this[prop]
        , newval = oldval
        , getter = function () {
          return newval;
        }
        , setter = function (val) {
          oldval = newval;
          return newval = handler.call(this, prop, oldval, val);
        }
        ;
      if (delete this[prop]) { // can't watch constants
        Object.defineProperty(this, prop, {
          get: getter
          , set: setter
          , enumerable: true
          , configurable: true
        });
      }
    }
  });
}

Obviously, I don't know much about the internals of JS or reflection in general. Here is a method that works for title:

var observer = new window.MutationObserver(function(mutations) {
  mutations.forEach(function(mutation) {
    change({title: mutation.target.textContent});
  });
});

observer.observe(document.querySelector('head > title'),
  { subtree: true, characterData: true, childList: true });

But I can't specify Location via a query selector and I'm pretty sure it would need to implement the node class for observer to work.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In non-Firefox browsers, you cannot set a watcher on location.href. I needed to set the watcher on location.pathway, location.hash, and location.search instead.

It is also better to just reuse a function instead of writing the same one out twice. I was able to shave it down to just this:

if (!Object.prototype.watch) { //don't overwrite gecko watch function
  Object.prototype.watch = function(prop, handler) {
    var oldval = this[prop], newval = oldval,
      getter = function() {
        return newval;
      },
      setter = function(val) {
        oldval = newval;
        return newval = handler.call(this, prop, oldval, val);
      };
    if (delete this[prop]) {
      Object.defineProperty(this, prop, {
        get: getter,
        set: setter
      });
    }
  };
}
share|improve this answer

This is a little bit of a hack, but not much more than anything else I have seen and it will work pretty much equally in all modern browsers.

var myTitle = document.title;
var myLocation = window.location.href;

setInterval(function() {
    if (myTitle != document.title || myLocation != window.location.href)
    {
        // Do something here;

        myTitle = document.title;
        myLocation = window.location.href;         
    }
}, 100);

It simply polls the properties in short intervals. To short to be visible for the user but it should also not have much CPU overhead.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I have a working hack ツ –  Indolering Mar 5 '14 at 2:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.