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I define two classes:

template<class Datatype>
class Node
{
    public:
        Node()
        {
            next = NULL;
            prev = NULL;
        }
        Node* getNext()
        {
            return next;
        }
        Node* getPrev()
        {
            return prev;
        }
        Datatype* getData()
        {
            return &data;
        }
        void changeNext()
        {
            next = NULL;
        }
        void changeNext(Node& nextNode)
        {
            next = &nextNode;
        }
        void changePrev()
        {
            prev = NULL;
        }
        void changePrev(Node& prevNode)
        {
            prev = &prevNode;
        }
        Node* addNext(Node &);
        Node* addPrev(Node &);
        void nodeDel();
        void addData(Datatype &);
    private:
        Node* next;
        Node* prev;
        Datatype data;
};

template<class Datatype>
class Stack
{
    public:
        Stack() : node()
        {
            ;
        }
        int push(Datatype &);
        Datatype pop();
        Datatype* peek();
    private:
        Node<Datatype> node;
};

I tried to do some debug. I push a packet into this stack using function call:

template <class Datatype>
int Stack<Datatype>::push(Datatype &new_data)
{
    Node<Datatype> *pt_node = new Node<Datatype>;
    if (pt_node == NULL)
        return -1;

    Datatype *pt_data;

    pt_data = (this -> node).getData();
    pt_node -> addData(*pt_data);   
    (this -> node).addData(new_data);

    pt_node -> addNext(this -> node);

    cout << ((node.getNext())) << endl;

    return 0;
}

I printed out the next pointer of the node. It should be NULL because it is the only packet in the stack and the result proves that. The out put when I call this function is 0. However, I changed the cout instruction of push function a little bit:

cout << ((node.getNext()) -> getData()) << endl;

I try to print out the data for the next node. Obviously nothing should be there because that node does not exist and I have proved node.getNext() returns 0. The strange thing is segmentation fault did not happen here and it did have a output 0x8. I don't know how could this happen.

share|improve this question
    
const int & != int &. The latter will fail to accept literals as arguments. – user1508519 Mar 3 '14 at 2:45
up vote 5 down vote accepted

getData returns a pointer to a member; so it doesn't need to dereference this, just add an offset to it. That's why you don't get a segmentation fault even if this is null.

Of course, it's still undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer

Dereferencing a NULL pointer is Undefined Behavior, that practically means anything can happen, it's not guaranteed to crash (though the OS will likely crash your application for its own safety) this is highly implementation dependent, and such code should not exist in your application.

Quoting the standard

Note: in particular, a null reference cannot exist in a well-defined program, because the only way to create such a reference would be to bind it to the “object” obtained by dereferencing a null pointer, which causes undefined behavior. As described in 9.6, a reference cannot be bound directly to a bit-field. —end note

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