Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am developing a C# Winforms application, part of the application will be uploading files to a webserver using AsyncUpload (using it,due to the need to use a porgress callback) , In the C# program

i got a simple for loop that calls The Uploading function

 for(int i=0;i < 10 ; i++)
{
  Uploadfun();
}

And the fun does some magic:

Uploadfun()
  { 
  // Logic comes here

   // webClient.UploadFileAsync runs a 2nd thread to perform upload .. 
   webClient.UploadFileAsync(uri, "PUT", fileNameOnHD);  

 }

And a callback that gets called when the Async upload is done

Upload_Completed_callback()
{
  //Callback event
}

Edit

The logic sequence:

  1. Fun gets called (from loop)
  2. Fun logic is executed and done..
  3. Goes back to for loop
  4. Callback will be called eventually, when UploadFileAsync (which is running some logic in another thread) will end

The problem is on the 3rd point, when the execution moves back to the for loop, i need to block the loop from continuing until the callback get called.

share|improve this question
3  
Do you have access to fun implementation? You should probably consider providing a synchronous interface on which the async API is implemented. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 6 '10 at 16:35
    
The way you are describing it, your code seems sequential and single threaded, which means that until the callback function is called the loop won't continue. Please correct me if I am wrong by giving more detailed explanation. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 6 '10 at 16:36
    
@Madi: Then you're doing this backwards. You should use the synchronous version of UploadFile at the core of the logic and use an async API on top of it if you need it. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 6 '10 at 16:42
1  
@Mehrdad: i am actually forced to use the Async version, because it provides me with "progress" callbacks, which is a requirement. –  Madi D. Feb 6 '10 at 16:45
    
(F# asyncs FTW!) –  Brian Feb 6 '10 at 17:28
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

So if I understand correctly, you want to call UploadFileAsync then block until the async call has hit your callback. If so, I'd use AutoResetEvent i.e

private readonly AutoResetEvent _signal = new AutoResetEvent(false); 

fun()
  { 
  // Logic comes here

   // runs a 2nd thread to perform upload .. calling "callback()" when done
   webClient.UploadFileAsync(uri, "PUT", fileNameOnHD);  

   _signal.WaitOne();   // wait for the async call to complete and hit the callback     
 }



callback()
 {
   //Callback event
   _signal.Set(); // signal that the async upload completed
 }

Using AutoResetEvent means that the state gets automatically reset after Set has been called and a waiting thread receives the signal via WaitOne

share|improve this answer
    
when using the Waitone() after the uploadAsync , The program is halting, and the Callback is not being called. –  Madi D. Feb 6 '10 at 17:14
    
okie.. i fixed the halting problem,called fun() in a separate thread, "obviously" calling it in the main thread is causing the issue !, @Juliet Kinda helped point out the problem.. thanks both of you =) –  Madi D. Feb 7 '10 at 14:10
add comment

In C# methods block by default, so you shouldn't need to do anything. I'm assuming that for some reason you are calling a non-blocking method that starts a background task / thread / whatever and gives you a callback when it's done. You want to call this asynchonous method in a synchronous manner.

You can call fun from inside the callback. Something along these lines (pseudo-code):

int n;

callFunTenTimes()
{
    n = 0;
    fun(n);
}

callback()
{
    ++n;
    if (n < 10)
       fun(n);
    else
       print("done");
}

This is similar to continuation passing style.

An advantage to this method is that you can also make your method asynchronous without adding any extra threads, locks, or extra logic - you just supply a callback function which your client can subscribe to. It works well in an event-driven environment.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats funny. Ive been thinking about my own problem along these lines: having the callback function do the 'meat' of what the loop used to do. This solution seems to keep the wait time to a minimum. –  Joe Feb 6 '10 at 17:06
    
i need the async version because it provides a "progress" callback which is a core requirement. –  Madi D. Feb 6 '10 at 17:12
    
@Madi D: If the requirement is that the upload must behave asynchronously, why not make your function an async function too, with a callback? Can you explain more about what you are using this for? Is this a WinForms app, ASP.NET, etc? –  Mark Byers Feb 6 '10 at 18:48
    
i edited the question and added answers to you questions, plus some extra info. –  Madi D. Feb 6 '10 at 22:39
    
+1 for teaching me a new concept, and giving me an alternative solution! –  Madi D. Feb 7 '10 at 14:10
add comment

Zebrabox does have it right using a WaitHandle. While Juliet's solution does work, the thread performing the spin-wait will consume a significant amount of processor in proportion to the WaitHandle, which would essentially be sitting idle.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 shedding light on both the top answers (to me).. –  Madi D. Feb 7 '10 at 23:18
    
It won't consume very much processor, but it may prevent the system from putting the CPU into a deeper idle state and hence draw down the battery faster on a laptop. –  Ben Voigt Feb 8 '10 at 18:59
add comment

The problem is here:

for(int i=0;i < 10 ; i++)
{
  fun(); <-- if we block until this function finishes here, we stop the UI thread
}

What you're doing is sequential. And if you can't afford to block the UI thread, move the loop off the UI thread:

volatile downloadComplete;

void DownloadUpdates()
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(state =>
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            downloadComplete = false;
            webClient.UploadFileAsync(uri, "PUT", fileNameOnHD);
            while(!downloadComplete) { Thread.Sleep(1); }
        });
}

Upload_Completed_callback()
{
    downloadComplete = true;
}

Now you can block the execution of the loop without halting your UI thread, and you also get the benefit of progress indicators from the webclient class.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't use a boolean variable for this, the compiler can optimize it away (which would cause the behavior of never continuing that the OP mentions). zebrabox showed the right way to do it, with a waitable event object. –  Ben Voigt Feb 6 '10 at 17:47
1  
@Ben: I appreciate your comments, but I think they're misleading. First, the compiler isn't going to optimize the bool away as long as its used or assigned somewhere (and presumably it is). Second, spin-waiting on a bool and resetEvents are valid ways to block a thread, both are the "right way to do it", neither are "wrong", choosing one or the other depends on the tastes of the programmer. –  Juliet Feb 6 '10 at 19:52
    
Thanks alot for the really useful answer,endded up combining the threading from your solution with @zebrabox's resetEvent solution, and now it is working.. =) –  Madi D. Feb 7 '10 at 14:18
    
@Juliet, According to the rules of the .NET memory model, these two are exactly equivalent: while(!downloadComplete) { Thread.Sleep(1); } and if (!downloadComplete) { while (true) { Thread.Sleep(1); } } Since the loop doesn't change the variable, the compiler can move the test outside the loop. I see that now you've added a syntax error trying to make downloadComplete volatile. If you fix the declaration, it will prevent the compiler from doing the optimization I mentioned, but it is still polling which is worse than the event for a number of reasons. –  Ben Voigt Feb 8 '10 at 18:58
    
@Ben: I appreciate your comment, but while(!downloadComplete) { Thread.Sleep(1); } and if (!downloadComplete) { while (true) { Thread.Sleep(1); } } are not equivalent in any memory model. Would you mind providing some MSDN documentation or a code sample demonstrating how polling compiles into the code you've provided (with or without volatile)? –  Juliet Feb 9 '10 at 0:33
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.