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With JSR 311 and it's implementations we have a powerful standard for exposing Java objects via Rest. However on the client side there seems to be something missing that is comparable to Apache Axis for SOAP - something that hides the web service and marshals the data transparently back to Java objects.

How do you create Java RESTful clients? Using HTTPConnection and manual parsing of the result? Or specialized clients for e.g. Jersey or Apache CXR?

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Just found Apache Wink in the Apache Incubator. Could be a interesting project for creating REST servers and clients. –  Yaba Jul 29 '09 at 12:13
1  
check this out: igorpolevoy.blogspot.com/2011/01/java-rest-with-ease.html thanks igor –  ipolevoy Jan 21 '11 at 22:34
    
Check out [Resting]( code.google.com/p/resting). It promises to invoke REST services and create list of objects from XML/JSON/YAML response in one step. –  neel Jul 21 '11 at 12:58
    
Resting has issues with POST requests. –  RyanBrady Apr 26 '12 at 15:37
    
You can do it in a very simple way with resteasy (by Jboss). I wrote a blog post about how to develop a Java REST client if you want a getting started guide. Anyway, there are hundreds of alternatives in Java. –  Guido García Sep 16 '12 at 14:17
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13 Answers

up vote 54 down vote accepted

As I mentioned in this thread I tend to use Jersey which implements JAX-RS and comes with a nice REST client. The nice thing is if you implement your RESTful resources using JAX-RS then the Jersey client can reuse the entity providers such as for JAXB/XML/JSON/Atom and so forth - so you can reuse the same objects on the server side as you use on the client side unit test.

For example here is a unit test case from the Apache Camel project which looks up XML payloads from a RESTful resource (using the JAXB object Endpoints). The resource(uri) method is defined in this base class which just uses the Jersey client API.

e.g.

    clientConfig = new DefaultClientConfig();
    client = Client.create(clientConfig);

    resource = client.resource("http://localhost:8080");
    // lets get the XML as a String
    String text = resource("foo").accept("application/xml").get(String.class);        

BTW I hope that future version of JAX-RS add a nice client side API along the lines of the one in Jersey

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Is there a method where we can mention REST service server list in ClientResource, in case the server is down try the next server? –  Njax3SmmM2x2a0Zf7Hpd Jul 17 '12 at 9:43
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Just an update, but to address James' 'BTW' comment, the new version of JAX-RS 2.0 will have a client-side API: infoq.com/presentations/Java-REST –  Nick Klauer Oct 15 '12 at 13:38
    
The link with text "here is a unit test case" is broken. –  dmiller309 Oct 10 '13 at 3:10
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This is an old question (2008) so there are many more options now than there were then:

UPDATE:

The new kid on the block which provides NIO support (although truthfully I don't think this really improves performance for clients like it does servers).

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UniREST is also pretty good nowadays. –  RDX May 27 '13 at 7:48
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You can use the standard Java SE APIs:

private void updateCustomer(Customer customer) { 
    try { 
        URL url = new URL("http://www.example.com/customers"); 
        HttpURLConnection connection = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection(); 
        connection.setDoOutput(true); 
        connection.setInstanceFollowRedirects(false); 
        connection.setRequestMethod("PUT"); 
        connection.setRequestProperty("Content-Type", "application/xml"); 

        OutputStream os = connection.getOutputStream(); 
        jaxbContext.createMarshaller().marshal(customer, os); 
        os.flush(); 

        connection.getResponseCode(); 
        connection.disconnect(); 
    } catch(Exception e) { 
        throw new RuntimeException(e); 
    } 
} 

Or you can use the REST client APIs provided by JAX-RS implementations such as Jersey. These APIs are easier to use, but require additional jars on your class path.

WebResource resource = client.resource("http://www.example.com/customers"); 
ClientResponse response = resource.type("application/xml");).put(ClientResponse.class, "<customer>...</customer."); 
System.out.println(response); 

For more information see:

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You can also check Restlet which has full client-side capabilities, more REST oriented that lower-level libraries such as HttpURLConnection or Apache HTTP Client (which we can leverage as connectors).

Best regards, Jerome Louvel

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You could try Rapa. Let us know your feedback about the same. And feel free to log issues or expected features.

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Rapa has a really nice interface and few dependencies. A good alternative to RestSharp in the .NET world. –  afternoon Apr 6 '11 at 17:04
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If you only wish to invoke a REST service and parse the response you can try out REST Assured:

// Make a GET request to "/lotto"
String json = get("/lotto").asString()
// Parse the JSON response
List<String> winnderIds = with(json).get("lotto.winners.winnerId");

// Make a POST request to "/shopping"
String xml = post("/shopping").andReturn().body().asString()
// Parse the XML
Node category = with(xml).get("shopping.category[0]");
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I use Apache HTTPClient to handle all the HTTP side of things.

I write XML SAX parsers for the XML content that parses the XML into your object model. I believe that Axis2 also exposes XML -> Model methods (Axis 1 hid this part, annoyingly). XML generators are trivially simple.

It doesn't take long to code, and is quite efficient, in my opinion.

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In my opinion this is the worst way to do REST. Manually handling serialization in Java is a waste of time when you have so many options like JAXB and Jackson. Even loading the whole document and using XPath is marginally slower than SAX and nothing compared to getting the XML (network speed). –  Adam Gent Feb 28 '11 at 18:59
    
i could say, "i agree". –  gumuruh Mar 21 '12 at 15:55
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I agree too, and I wrote the original comment. Back then I had a desire for control of the deserialisation, but nowadays I would use Jackson and decently annotated model classes. –  JeeBee Oct 15 '13 at 9:18
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I'd like to point out 2 more options:

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Try JdkRequest from jcabi-http (I'm a developer). This is how it works:

String body = new JdkRequest("http://www.google.com")
  .header("User-Agent", "it's me")
  .fetch()
  .body()

Check this blog post for more details: http://www.yegor256.com/2014/04/11/jcabi-http-intro.html

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Though its simple to create a HTTP client and make a reuest. But if you want to make use of some auto generated clients, You can make use of WADL to describe and generate code.

You can use RestDescribe to generate and compile WSDL, you can generate clients in php, ruby, python, java and C# using this. It generates clean code and there is a good change that you have to tweak it a bit after code generation, you can find good documentation and underlying thoughts behind the tool here.

There are few interesting and useful WADL tools mentioned on wintermute.

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I wrote a library that maps a java interface to a remote JSON REST service:

https://github.com/ggeorgovassilis/spring-rest-invoker

public interface BookService {
   @RequestMapping("/volumes")
   QueryResult findBooksByTitle(@RequestParam("q") String q);

   @RequestMapping("/volumes/{id}")
   Item findBookById(@PathVariable("id") String id);
}
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I've recently tried Retrofit Library from square, Its great and you can call your rest API very easily. Annotation based configuration allows us to get rid of lot of boiler plate coding.

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You can use java.net.URL

public class URL {
public URL(java.lang.String s)
throws java.net.MalformedURLException {}
public java.net.URLConnection
openConnection() throws java.io.IOException {}
...
}

From a URL, you can create an HttpURLConnection that allows you to invoke specific

requests. Here’s an example of doing a simple GET request:
URL url = new URL("http://example.com/customers/1");
connection = (HttpURLConnection) getUrl.openConnection();
connection.setRequestMethod("GET");
connection.setRequestProperty("Accept", "application/xml");
if (connection.getResponseCode() != 200) {
throw new RuntimeExceptioin("Operation failed: "
+ connection.getResponseCode());
}
System.out.println("Content-Type: 

" + connection.getContentType());
BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new
InputStreamReader(connection.getInputStream()));
String line = reader.readLine();
while (line != null) {
System.out.println(line);
line = reader.readLine();
}
connection.disconnect();
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