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I have bitvector coming from the database of length 1 Mio with two bits each representing one integer number for compressed storage:

the bit string : 10110001  from the database
array             2 3 0 1  needed for further processing

The current solution is:

my $bitstring =
$sth->fetchrow_array();    # has 2 bits / snp, need 2 convert to I
my $snp_no = 1000000;
for ( my $i = 0; $i <= $snp_no - 1; $i++ ) {
    my $A2 = substr ($bitstring ,$j,2);
    $j = $j + 2;
    my $vec = Bit::Vector->new_Bin(32, $A2);
    @bitArray->[$i] = $vec->to_Dec();
}

This does work but is is waaay too slow: to process one such vector take a second and with thousands of them the processing will take hours.

does someone have an idea how this can be made faster?

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1  
Use unpack? –  reinierpost Mar 3 at 11:22
    
@reinierpost I thought that as well but i had problems implementing that as an answer. unpack("s", pack("b2*", $bitstring)) does not work at all. The pack fails as it skips to the next byte in the string and does for some reason object to the *. And even if it would, it packs into a single byte and i cannot see a template to convert single bytes to integer. Only shorts which have 2 bytes. So while i certainly agree that there has to be a convenient and elegant way to do this with pack and unpack, i fail to see it. –  DeVadder Mar 3 at 12:28
    
How many numbers are you packing into a string? (less than 16? less than 32? More than 32?) And what if the number of numbers isn't divisible by 4? –  ikegami Mar 3 at 12:31
    
How are you obtaining your bitstrings from the database? Perhaps it's easy to get a different representation at that point? –  reinierpost Mar 3 at 12:52
    
Thanks for looking at this issue. I quickly hacked this in Fortran90. For our 5500 genotypes dataset (each with this 1mio string of 1 and 0, this takes with the above Perl code 40 minutes, while Fortran does this in 10sec. –  user3374450 Mar 3 at 12:59

2 Answers 2

If you start with the data "packed", use the following:

my @decode =
   map [
      ($_ >> 6) & 3,
      ($_ >> 4) & 3,
      ($_ >> 2) & 3,
      ($_ >> 0) & 3,
   ],
      0x00..0xFF;

my @nums = map @{ $decode[$_] }, unpack 'C*', $bytes;

For me, this takes about roughly 1.1s for 1,000,000 bytes, which is to say 1.1 microseconds per byte.


A specialized pure C solution takes about half the time.

use Inline C => <<'__EOI__';

void decode(AV* av, SV* sv) {
   STRLEN len;
   U8* p = (U8*)SvPVbyte(sv, len);

   av_fill(av, len*4);
   av_clear(av);
   while (len--) {
      av_push(av, newSViv(*p >> 6    ));
      av_push(av, newSViv(*p >> 4 & 3));
      av_push(av, newSViv(*p >> 2 & 3));
      av_push(av, newSViv(*(p++)  & 3));
   }
}

__EOI__

decode(\my @nums, $bytes);

If you start with the binary representation of the bits, use the following first:

my $bytes = packed('B*', $bits);

(This assumes the number of bits is divisible by 8. Left-pad with zeroes if it isn't, and don't forget to remove the extra entries this creates in @decode.)

share|improve this answer
    
Added to my answer. –  ikegami Mar 3 at 14:55
    
Thanks for all the good suggestions!! The above decode/map is really nice and concise. However, its the same speed as my previous implementation about a second per sample, with 5000 of those we are back to the 40 min. So going the C route seems promising as I would assume that C should be able to give the same speed as Fortran. Even halving the speed by using the C version must still give muuuch scope for improvement as the Fortran version takes less than a minute. –  user3374450 Mar 3 at 16:02
    
For number crunching in Perl, there's PDL. If you're going to work with scalars, you can't get faster than what I posted. –  ikegami Mar 3 at 16:03
    
that is a very good pointer. Yes, there is a good amount of vector/matrix operation involved, So PDL certainly will be something I am going to look at. Thanks! –  user3374450 Mar 3 at 17:08
    
as a Fortran person, I am still confused what is called bits in Perl. You write: "If you start with the binary representation of the bits, use the following first:" my data come as a bitstring. My understanding is that it is a character string of 1 and 0, i.e. one byte per bit. –  user3374450 Mar 3 at 18:32

Is this any faster?

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my %bin2dec = (
  '0'  => 0,
  '1'  => 1,
  '00' => 0,
  '01' => 1,
  '10' => 2,
  '11' => 3
);

#warn "$_ => $bin2dec{$_}\n" for sort keys %bin2dec;

my @results;

while (<>)
{

  foreach my $bitstring (/([01]+)/g)
  {
    my @result;

    #warn "bitstring is $bitstring\n";

    for ( my $i = 0 ; $i < length($bitstring) ; $i += 2 )
    {
      #warn "value is ", substr( $bitstring, $i, 2 ), "\n";
      push( @result, $bin2dec{ substr( $bitstring, $i, 2 ) } );
    }
    push( @results, \@result );
  }
}

foreach my $result (@results)
{
  print join( ' ', @$result ), "\n";
}

saved to file b2dec. Example output:

$ echo 10010101010010010101001111001011010101w00101010 | b2dec
2 1 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 3 3 0 2 3 1 1 1
0 2 2 2
$ b2dec b2dec
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
2
3
1
0
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