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In Agner Fog's excellent microarchitecture.pdf (section 9.14) I read that:

Store forwarding works in the following cases: [...] When a write of 128 or 256 bits is followed by a read of the same size and the same address, aligned by 16.

On the other hand, Intel's Architecture Optimization Reference Manual (2.2.5.2 Intel Sandy Bridge, L1 DCache) I read that

Stores cannot forward to loads in the following cases: [...] Any load that crosses a 16-byte boundary of a 32-byte store.

Any load sounds like 32 byte load also.. I wrote the following simple code to test this, and it seems that 32 byte stores are not forwarded to subsequent 32 byte loads on the Sandy Bridge architecture. Here is the code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <malloc.h>

int main(){

  long i;

  // aligned memory address
  double *tempa = (double*)memalign(4096, sizeof(double)*4);
  for(i=0; i<4; i++) tempa[i] = 1.0;

  for(i=0; i<1000000000; i++){ // 1e9 iterations

#ifdef TEST_AVX
    __asm__("vmovapd    %%ymm12, (%0)\n\t"
            "vmovapd    (%0), %%ymm12\n\t" 
        : 
        :"r"(tempa));
#else
    __asm__("movapd %%xmm12, (%0)\n\t"
            "movapd (%0), %%xmm12\n\t"
            :
            :"r"(tempa));
#endif
  }
}

The only thing done in the loop is reading/writing from/to a 4k-aligned memory location and a vector register. When compiled with AVX instruction set (gcc -O3 -DTEST_AVX) the execution time is 3.1s on my 2.7GHz i7-2620M. When using SSE2 instruction set, the time is 2.5s. I have looked at the performance counters. In the AVX case I count one store-forwarding block event per iteration (counter 03H 02H LD_BLOCKS.STORE_FORWARD). The counter reads 0 for the SSE2 case.

Can anybody shed some light on this? Does SB indeed not support forwarding of 32 byte stores to 32 byte loads? If the latter is the case, spilling ymm registers seems a rather expensive thing to do..

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1  
What's the point of allocating 128 doubles? As far as I can tell (I am not that familiar with reading inline assembly) you only read and write from the first four or eight doubles. It seems to me that double *tempa = (double*)memalign(4096, sizeof(double)*8); would suffice. –  Z boson Mar 4 at 19:01
    
@Zboson Sure, I could allocate a single double. It could also be stack space. The only important thing is 32 byte alignment (I actually align to page size). And the only point of this allocation is to have an aligned place in memory to store to and read from. I have modified the code in the question to only allocate 1 double. –  angainor Mar 4 at 19:21
    
hold on, I think you need to allocated 4 doubles (I said eight before but it should be 4). movapd will load/store 2 doubles and vmovapd will load/store 4 doubles. –  Z boson Mar 4 at 20:27
    
@Zboson ahh bummer. fixed. yes - I only need two for sse. –  angainor Mar 4 at 20:31
    
ok, now I'm, more or less, happy... –  Z boson Mar 4 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems that there is no store-to-load blocking with 32-byte loads on Sandy Bridge after all. Consider the following modified loop body:

#ifdef TEST_AVX
__asm__("vmovapd    %%ymm12, (%0)\n\t"
        "vmovapd    (%0), %%ymm13\n\t" 
    : 
    :"r"(tempa));
#else
__asm__("movapd %%xmm12, (%0)\n\t"
        "movapd (%0), %%xmm13\n\t"
        :
        :"r"(tempa));
#endif

The change is the destination register - I now use two different registers for load and store so that there is no dependence between the two instructions and subsequent iterations. In this case the SSE version takes 1 cycle per iteration, while the AVX version takes 2 cycles. This is consistent with the fact that SB has a capacity of two 16-bytes loads per cycle. Hence, loading 32 bytes takes two cycles - no stall.

The problem must be connected with the counter logic. Clearly, in the AVX case the LD_BLOCKS.STORE_FORWARD is incremented, although no block takes place. This should be taken into account while analyzing performance using the counters.

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