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What is de difference between is_a? and ===?

Running this Code:

puts myObj.class
puts myObj.is_a?(Hash)
puts myObj === Hash   #Curious 
puts Hash  === myObj

The Outputis:

Hash
true
false        #Why?
true
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Many style guides recommend not using === in your code, as it's slated for use in the built-in case construct. –  Kyle Smith Mar 3 '14 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

They are mostly the same in essence, but === can also be overridden in subclasses.

=== is usually a light wrapper around something, mainly so that the case construct can use it implicitly. By default it's a wrapper around Object#is_a? (see source).

These two however are intended to be equivalent constructs.

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1  
The default implementation mod === obj actually calls obj.is_a?(mod) –  Stefan Mar 3 '14 at 16:14
    
@Stefan yes, that's why I've called it a wrapper. Maybe I should clarify that it's a wrapper around is_a?. Thanks –  Agis Mar 3 '14 at 16:25

Clear example

1)$> Integer === 1 # => true 

2)$> 1 === Integer # => false

1) 1 is an instance of Integer, but 2) Integer is not an instance of 1.

But also returns true if is an instance of any of its subclasses, for example:

$ > Numeric === 1   # => true 
$ > Numeric === 1.5 # => true

$ > Fixnum === 1    # => true 
$ > Fixnum === 1.5  # => false
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