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When you have a function (pointer) as an argument to another function in c++ does the function (that is in the argument) have to be a void function?

eg. Can you have a function like

void run(int (*method)(int, double, vector), int dimension)

here the function method returns an int not a void. I am also having difficulty with the vector. Should it be a &vector?

When I then call it in my main I have it as:

run(jacobi_method(Vnew, V, vec), dimension);

but it does not want to work. Thanks

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"doesn't work" is not an error description people can help you with. Be precise. –  nvoigt Mar 3 at 15:59
1  
Do you want to give the result of the function as parameter, or the function itself? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 3 at 15:59
    
The syntax you are trying to use for passing the function pointer is wrong! Change run(jacobi_method(Vnew, V, vec), dimension); to run(jacobi_method, dimension);. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 3 at 16:03
    
Sorry for being imprecise about the error I can't actually see what it says the error is and it just won't compile. Thank you for you comments- if I change it to just run(jacobi_method, dimension) then at what point can I enter the parameters needed for the function jacobi_method? Luchian I would like the function jacobi_method to be carried out in void when the method is called. –  user3343772 Mar 3 at 16:08
    
The call as you make it here, actually calls the jacobi_method with the parameters you pass it, then tries to pass the integer result to 'run'. So, if run was like void run(int r, int dimension), this would work, but I don't think this is what you intend –  DNT Mar 3 at 16:11
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7 Answers 7

When you have a function (pointer) as an argument to another function in c++ does the function (that is in the argument) have to be a void function?

No, it can be any type of function; as long as the code using it calls it correctly.

Should it be a &vector?

You mean, should it be a reference? Only you can decide. Is the function supposed to modify it? Then it should be a reference. If not, it's probably more efficient to pass by const reference rather than value.

run(jacobi_method(Vnew, V, vec), dimension);

That's trying to pass the result of calling the function, not a pointer to the function. You want

run(jacobi_method, dimension);
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eg. Can you have a function like

void run(int (*method)(int, double, vector), int dimension)

Yes, that is ok, just remember that vector is a template, so it should be

void run(int (*method)(int, double, vector<some_type>), int dimension)

As for your calling,

run(jacobi_method(Vnew, V, vec), dimension);

You can't pass the arguments to the function pointer. You should call it as

run(jacobi_method, dimension);

Here is a complete working code:

    #include <vector>
    #include <iostream>

    using namespace std;

    int jacobi_method(int a, double b, vector<int> c)
    {
        cout << "jacobi_method: " << a << " " << b << endl;
        for(int i=0; i<c.size(); i++)
            cout << c[i] << endl;
        return 8;
    }

    void run(int (*method)(int, double, vector<int>), int dimension)
    {
        int result;
        vector<int> a;
        a.push_back(1337);
        a.push_back(1338);
        result = method(dimension,2.1,a);
        cout << "Result = " << result << endl;
    }

    int main()
    {
        run(jacobi_method, 2);
        return 0;
    }
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Thank you that looks very helpful I will try that. –  user3343772 Mar 3 at 16:19
    
I have tried that and now it keeps saying there is no matching function to run, although I've checked run is defined the same everywhere! –  user3343772 Mar 3 at 16:26
    
Really? Did you run exactly what I wrote? It works fine here. Can you paste the error message? –  davir Mar 3 at 16:30
    
It is "there is no matching function to run", my version is slightly different because I have used what you have written with my code although I'm sure I've done the same as you have above. –  user3343772 Mar 3 at 16:34
    
Maybe you defined the method the same, but you are calling it with wrong type of parameters. e.g.: you defined with vector<int> but are calling with a vector<double>. Please run my code as is and see if you still get the error. –  davir Mar 3 at 16:40
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run(jacobi_method(Vnew, V, vec), dimension);

should be

run(jacobi_method, dimension);
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Thanks for the help, if I change this at what point do I enter the parameters to jacobi_method? –  user3343772 Mar 3 at 16:08
    
@user3343772 When you call your function though the pointer? Have you even grasped the concept of function pointers? –  Paranaix Mar 3 at 16:09
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Yes, it is possible to pass a non void return function as parameter. A full sample:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int sum(int a, int b) {
    return a + b;
}

int substract(int a, int b) {
    return a - b;
}

void run(int (*f)(int a, int b), int a, int b) {
    int res = f(a, b);
    cout << "Result: " << res << endl;
}

int main()
{
    run(sum, 10, 5);
    run(substract, 10, 5);

    return 0;
}
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ah thankyou I will try that, so here: void run(int (*f)(int a, int b), int a, int b) { int res = f(a, b); cout << "Result: " << res << endl; } the second int a, int b are where you declare a and b for in the function? –  user3343772 Mar 3 at 16:12
    
yes, a confusion is possible, so i explain: int (*f)(int a, int b) : meens the argument is a pointeur on function that take to int parameter and return a int value int a : meens first int parameter of function run int b : meens second int parameter of function run after, in the function run(): int res = f(a, b); meens : call the function f (the pointer on function) with the two int parameter value of run function –  Fabecc Mar 4 at 8:00
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Such definition is legal

void run(int (*method)(int, double, vector), int dimension)

But,

run(jacobi_method(Vnew, V, vec), dimension);

is equivalent to

int r = jacobi_method(Vnew, V, vec);
run(r, dimension);

so you should call:

run(jacobi_method, dimension);

About the vector question, passed by reference (Vector & vec or const Vector & vec for read only) is recommended, because passed by value (Vector vec) actually make a copy, which will lead to low efficient in most conditions.

So just pass vector by value only when you tend to make a copy. The same rule can apply to any other parameter passing, such as other containers and user defined objects

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Yes you can have a function that accepts a pointer to another function with a specific signature:

void run(int (*method)(int, double, std::vector<int>), int dimension)
{
     std::vector<int> vec;   
     // put some values in the vector here
     int result = method(1, 2.5, vec);   // this will call the function
}

And the invocation:

int my_method(int x, double d, std::vector<int> v)
{
   int result;
   // function code here
   return result;
}

run(my_method, dimension);

But, if you want to pass a function with specific parameters to 'run' and also have the ability to change these original parameters inside 'run', then you need to pass in a functor that wraps the method and its arguments, so your 'run' will get the result based on the original parameters, and/or whatever changes 'run' made itself.

Let me know if this is what you really want.

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The other posters have pointed out the mistake in your syntax, I'll answer the other question that you have: How do you specify the parameters for the function in question.

If you want to specify them at the moment that you construct the function pointer (as in your original post), your function's type should actually be int (*method)(). You don't expect anyone to be able to change the function parametrs through the pointer, and this is why your pointer is actually to a function accepting no parameters. If you want to re-use some function that you already have, and assign some parameters, and pass the function as a pointer, with the parameters that you assigned, what you need is std::bind. Some documentation on it: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/functional/bind

In essence, what this allows you to do, is to take one function pointer, pass some parameters to it, and get a new function pointer, which will call your original function, but with the parameters that you specified.

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