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I tried to use bang patterns on part of the code in Temporal correlations when employing System.Random (not present when employing System.Random.TF) in order to improve the memory consumption, but it seems that the ghci memory usage still increases at an alarming rate, despite the use of bang patterns. That is if I have the code :

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
module Main where
import System.Random

generateNthGenerator !startGen 0 = startGen
generateNthGenerator !startGen n = generateNthGenerator newGen (n-1)
  where newGen = snd $ ((random startGen) :: (Bool,StdGen)) 

main = do 
  print $ generateNthGenerator (mkStdGen 0) 10000000

Then upon loading this into ghci and running (by typing main in ghci) I find that the memory usage rapidly increases.

I have also observed that this memory increase happens evens for the following bang-patterned factorial code, albeit at a slower rate :

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
module Main where

getFactorialAcc 1 !acc = acc
getFactorialAcc n !acc = getFactorialAcc (n-1) (acc * n)

main = do 
  print $ getFactorialAcc 1000000 1

For this latter code the memory consumption initially stays at about 30MB (for about a minute) before suddenly starting to increase.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried to compile it with -O2? –  Yuuri Mar 3 at 17:19
    
@Yuuri Hi, when I compile with ghc the memory consumption seems fine. However with ghci memory consumption seems to blow up. –  artella Mar 3 at 17:26
1  
I have no explanation for your first example, but I suspect your factorial example just requires a lot of memory. 1000000! has 5.5 million (decimal) digits. –  Jake McArthur Mar 3 at 17:26
3  
Actually, I think the first one can be explained, too. You are forcing the StdGen, but actually if you look in System.Random's source, you will see that the two fields of that type are lazy, so you aren't actually forcing them. You would probably be better off forcing that Bool you are generating each time. Also, it's kind of crazy that those fields are not strict. I would consider raising this as a bug report or something. –  Jake McArthur Mar 3 at 17:31
    
@JakeMcArthur Ah cool, what you said about the factorial code makes complete sense, thanks. –  artella Mar 3 at 17:36

1 Answer 1

Thanks to Jake McArthur (see comment above) the solution to containing the memory usage in the case of the random number generator is to write the code as :

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
module Main where
import System.Random

generateNthGenerator startGen 0 = startGen
generateNthGenerator startGen n = generateNthGenerator newGen (n-1)
  where randTuple = ((random startGen) :: (Bool,StdGen))
        !randBool = (fst randTuple)
        newGen = snd randTuple 

main = do 
  print $ generateNthGenerator (mkStdGen 0) 10000000

Alternatively one can do as Antal S-Z suggested below :

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}
module Main where
import System.Random

generateNthGenerator startGen 0 = startGen
generateNthGenerator startGen n = generateNthGenerator newGen (n-1)
  where !(!_, newGen) = (random startGen) :: (Bool,StdGen)

main = do 
  print $ generateNthGenerator (mkStdGen 0) 10000000
share|improve this answer
1  
You should be able to simplify this to where (!_, newGen) = random startGen :: (Bool,StdGen) (untested). –  Antal S-Z Mar 3 at 20:37
    
@AntalS-Z : Thanks I tried what you suggested but it still resulted in the memory exploding. However the following variant of your suggestion works : where !(!_, newGen) = (random startGen) :: (Bool,StdGen) where I have put an extra exclamation between where and the ( –  artella Mar 3 at 21:41

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