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I have been at this for a few days and it is driving me mad. I have a control that inherits from System.Windows.Forms.Panel and I'm trying to override OnPaint. It just plain, outright IGNORES it.

public class CollapsiblePanel : System.Windows.Forms.Panel
{
  public CollapsiblePanel()
  {
   //
   // Required for the Windows Form Designer
   //
   InitializeComponent();

   //
   // TODO: Add any constructor code after InitializeComponent call
   //
   SetStyle
    (
     ControlStyles.AllPaintingInWmPaint | 
     ControlStyles.UserPaint      | ControlStyles.DoubleBuffer   |
     ControlStyles.ResizeRedraw     | ControlStyles.Selectable ,
     true
    );
        }

  protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
  {
            // This never runs no matter what I try!
            base.OnPaint(e);
        }
}
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Works on my machine... can you post an example of how you're using this control? –  Aaronaught Feb 7 '10 at 0:48
    
FlowLayoutPanel.Controls.Add(new CollapsiblePanel()); –  Ciel Feb 7 '10 at 0:49
    
Same results as Aaronaught. –  Cory Charlton Feb 7 '10 at 0:49
    
@Stacey, I'm afraid you're going to have to be more specific. I can drop your CollapsiblePanel onto a FlowLayoutPanel on a Form and it executes that method just fine. Either you've modified the designer-generated InitializeComponent, or some control in your hierarchy is blocking WM_PAINT messages. –  Aaronaught Feb 7 '10 at 1:04
    
How do you know it never runs? –  jeffamaphone Feb 7 '10 at 1:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I have the same problem just with a ProgressBar, when i try to override the OnPaint.. It's never called.


I found the solution here: http://www.osix.net/modules/article/?id=826

You must create a constructor and enable user-painting like this:

SetStyle(ControlStyles.AllPaintingInWmPaint | ControlStyles.UserPaint | ControlStyles.OptimizedDoubleBuffer | ControlStyles.ResizeRedraw, true);

Default values, probably vary depending on framework version and OS.

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this worked, but for a different reason!! Apparently, the ORDER in which they go in actually matters (this doesn't make any sense - aren't enums just bit codes? ) - changing the order solved the problem for me. –  Ciel Mar 8 '10 at 15:17
3  
@Stacey: Yes, enums ARE bit flags, and order of the enums when logically OR-ing them is NOT important. SetStyle method gets the same combination of flags regardless of the order in which you specify them. –  Groo Jan 21 '11 at 21:12

I had the problem of not seeing that it was running sometimes. But this works RIGHT AWAY on Windows 7 x64, .NET Framework 4.0. Just added it to a form.

class Class1 : Panel
{
    protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnPaint(e);
        Console.WriteLine("hello world, I'm painting myself");
        // Process.Start("notepad.exe");
    }
}

If you can't see the console output try the Process.Start(...) line.

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