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I'm no MVC expert, but I'm fairly sure this is implementable; however, I don't know how to do it in MVC 4.

For testing, I'm using the default web app given when you create a site using VS 2012.

Consider, for simplicity, that HomeController.Index() is hit at exactly the same time by multiple users (for example 3). I want to execute a method that is mutexed so as only one will execute at a time; hence forcing them serially. I don't care what order. I know of the warnings about blocking a page and that everything should be async, but for this I need to block for a very short period of time.

public class HomeController : Controller {
    private String dosomething() {
        String str;
        str = "SomeValue"; //<-- Will vary
        return str;
    }

    public ActionResult Index() {
        String str;
        // How do I do implement the following, preferably with a timeout to be safe
        Lock(dosomething);
            str = dosomething();
        unLock(dosomething);
        return View();
    }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to restrict the execution to one at a time, then you'll need a static lock object:

public class HomeController : Controller {
    private static object _lockobject = new object();

And then:

public ActionResult Index() {
    String str;
    lock (_lockobject)
    {
        str = dosomething();
    }
    return View();
}

If you need a timeout, then maybe use Monitor.TryEnter instead of lock:

public ActionResult Index() {
    String str;
    if (Monitor.TryEnter(_lockobject, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5)))
    {
        str = dosomething();
        Monitor.Exit(_lockobject);
    }
    else str = "Took too long!";
    return View();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. Many thanks. The timeout is definitely my preference. I don't want to keep it locked up too long if things were to go crazy. –  Lee Mar 3 at 18:57
    
Interestingly enough, when I use the timeout approach, the first one works great, but after that they all timeout. –  Lee Mar 3 at 19:08
1  
@Lee my mistake -- you also need Monitor.Exit to release the lock. –  McGarnagle Mar 3 at 19:10
    
That did it. Many thanks again –  Lee Mar 3 at 19:12

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